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Ancient Greek Dance. Three preliminary studies
Author:
This book is not another history of the dance in ancient Greece, but wants to lay the groundwork on which such a history should properly be build. The three preliminary studies offered here are, first, an extensive historiography of the subject which seeks to illuminate where we stand at present in reference to the large amount of work done on ancient Greek dance for the past 500 years. Secondly, an exercise in source criticism, embracing both texts and imagery, in order to establish the limits to which we can push any investigation, and thirdly, an attempt at model building to provide an explicit theoretical framework for future research. This is the first time that some of the approaches of the new dance scholarship which has arisen during the past few decades have been systematically applied to the dancing of the ancient world.
In: The Impact of Imperial Rome on Religions, Ritual and Religious Life in the Roman Empire
Volume Editors: and
Formerly Études Préliminaires aux Religions Orientales dans l'Empire Romain, the series Religions in the Graeco-Roman World is a forum for studies in the social and cultural function of religions in the Greek and the Roman world, dealing with the religions of city and region between ca. 400 BCE and 700 CE, both on their own terms and in their interaction with early Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. Special attention is given to the religious history of regions and cities which illustrate the practical workings of these processes.

The series published an average of three volumes per year over the last five years.

Abstract

The integrative power of the empire is usually taken for granted. But modern scholars might be so much used to living in societies where monotheistic religion, racism, and nationalism contribute to a “hostile environment” for “the other”, that they tend to see everywhere people(s) in need of social, ethnic, political, etcetera, integration. It is quite conceivable that no such need was felt in the Roman Empire. Even if it would have been felt, integration would still not be what we would see happening. In my previous work on convergence and divergence within the Roman Empire, I considered divergence to be a critique of integration. There I was wrong. Nevertheless, ‘integration’ remains an unworkable concept. Its dictionary definitions and its connotations in everyday usage imply a process of homogenisation or assimilation, usually concerning the subsuming of some subgroup into the mainstream. It is not so much divergence at the local level that hinders this: the problem goes much deeper. Integration as commonly understood assumes two more or less static, homogenous entities which are being integrated, or one of which is integrated into the other. This is not a useful way to think about culture contact and cultural change at all. It is impossible to establish who is integrating into what, the who and the what being in constant flux. It is meaningless to speak of some group being integrated into the Empire, as if that process had a particular starting and end point. The different cultural groups making up the Roman Empire are moving targets, ever changing, always in the process of becoming – as are modern societies and its (sub)groups.

If the concept of integration does not work, what does? Despite much criticism directed towards it (or rather towards an outdated caricature), I still stand by the concept of acculturation: the changes we see occurring when people from different cultural backgrounds interact. It is a multidirectional and multidimensional process that usually ends in some kind of biculturalism or multiculturalism. That makes it a great concept to describe the multifarious and infinitely complex processes that take place within a multicultural Roman Empire – without recourse to integration (or Romanisation – which with most authors seems to imply integration). Acculturation allows us to move our attention away from imponderables to things we can analyse: what areas of life are affected by change? At what speed, to what degree? Amongst which (sub)groups do these changes occur? How durable are they? And so on. But there is one more step to take: in order to understand why a particular scenario plays out, we have to consider individual psychology, choice theory in particular. But the complexity of what we are dealing with is not to be underestimated.

In: Understanding Integration in the Roman World
This online collection of Religions in the Graeco-Roman World, Brill’s flagship series in religion in antiquity, presents monographs and collections of essays that make original contributions to this long-standing field. The series, formerly known as Études Préliminaires aux Religions Orientales dans l'Empire Romain, is a forum for studies in the social and cultural function of religions in the Greek and the Roman worlds, dealing with the religions of city and region between ca. 400 bce and 700 ce, both on their own terms and in their interaction with early Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. Special attention is given to the religious history of regions and cities which illustrate the practical workings of these processes.

Also included is Studies in Greek and Roman Religion (1980-1990), a series of international studies in Hellenic and Roman theology.

This collection contains Études Préliminaires aux Religions Orientales dans l'Empire Romain, Volumes 1-113; Religions in the Graeco-Roman World, Volumes 114-183; and Studies in Greek and Roman Religion: volumes 1-7.

The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.
The online collection of Religions in the Graeco-Roman World, Brill’s flagship series in religion in antiquity, presents monographs and collections of essays that make original contributions to this long-standing field. The series, formerly known as Études Préliminaires aux Religions Orientales dans l'Empire Romain, is a forum for studies in the social and cultural function of religions in the Greek and the Roman worlds, dealing with the religions of city and region between ca. 400 bce and 700 ce, both on their own terms and in their interaction with early Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. Special attention is given to the religious history of regions and cities which illustrate the practical workings of these processes.

This 2017 Supplement contains Volumes 184-187 from the Religions in the Graeco-Roman World book series:
Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, by Gil Renberg
Sacred Thresholds: The Door to the Sanctuary in Late Antiquity, edited by Emilie van Opstall
The Tradition of Hermes Trismegistus: The Egyptian Priestly Figure as a Teacher of Hellenized Wisdom, by Christian H. Bull
Individuals and Materials in the Greco-Roman Cults of Isis: Agents, Images, and Practices, edited by Valentino Gasparini and Richard Veymiers

The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.
The online collection of Religions in the Graeco-Roman World, Brill’s flagship series in religion in antiquity, presents monographs and collections of essays that make original contributions to this long-standing field. The series, formerly known as Études Préliminaires aux Religions Orientales dans l'Empire Romain, is a forum for studies in the social and cultural function of religions in the Greek and the Roman worlds, dealing with the religions of city and region between ca. 400 bce and 700 ce, both on their own terms and in their interaction with early Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. Special attention is given to the religious history of regions and cities which illustrate the practical workings of these processes.

This 2018 Supplement contains Volumes 188-191 from the Religions in the Graeco-Roman World book series.

The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.
The online collection of Religions in the Graeco-Roman World, Brill’s flagship series in religion in antiquity, presents monographs and collections of essays that make original contributions to this long-standing field. The series, formerly known as Études Préliminaires aux Religions Orientales dans l'Empire Romain, is a forum for studies in the social and cultural function of religions in the Greek and the Roman worlds, dealing with the religions of city and region between ca. 400 bce and 700 ce, both on their own terms and in their interaction with early Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. Special attention is given to the religious history of regions and cities which illustrate the practical workings of these processes.

This 2019 Supplement contains Volumes 192-194 from the Religions in the Graeco-Roman World book series:

The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.
The online collection of Religions in the Graeco-Roman World, Brill’s flagship series in religion in antiquity, presents monographs and collections of essays that make original contributions to this long-standing field. The series, formerly known as Études Préliminaires aux Religions Orientales dans l'Empire Romain, is a forum for studies in the social and cultural function of religions in the Greek and the Roman worlds, dealing with the religions of city and region between ca. 400 bce and 700 ce, both on their own terms and in their interaction with early Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. Special attention is given to the religious history of regions and cities which illustrate the practical workings of these processes.

This 2021 Supplement contains Volumes 195-198 from the Religions in the Graeco-Roman World book series.

The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.