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Author: Fulya Batur

Innovative endeavours relying on the use of agricultural biodiversity differ widely in their actors, institutional structures and corresponding economic realities. Farmers have been selecting and improving plant varieties for more than ten thousand years, relying on opportunities for saving and freely exchanging seeds at local or regional levels, and developing locally-adapted and genetically diverse landraces. These varieties have in parallel been conserved and exchanged between eager gardeners, who have at times regulated their exchanges through institutionalised seed exchange networks. Seed-saving and exchange mechanisms that are observed either in traditional and organic farming communities or in gardener-oriented initiatives aim to preserve agricultural biodiversity on farm, maintain an age-old plant improvement model alive and all the while endorse notions of distributional equity and participatory justice. Drawing from case-studies of associations such as Kokopelli, the Seed Savers Exchange, or the Real Seed Catalogue amongst others, we shall highlight emerging practices that try to overcome regulatory shortcomings or political unwillingness to promote informal markets oriented towards biodiversity conservation, especially in Europe. By establishing themselves as seed distribution and knowledge dissemination networks, launching heritage farms, advocating legal change and fighting litigation, 21st century seed savers and emerge as sustainable and equitable communities striving to achieve the disengaged principles of sustainability and environmental justice embedded in international biodiversity instruments such as the 1992 Convention on Biological Diversity and the 2004 International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture.

In: Power, Justice and Citizenship: The Relationships of Power
In: Implementing the Nagoya Protocol
In: Implementing the Nagoya Protocol
In: Implementing the Nagoya Protocol
In: Implementing the Nagoya Protocol
In: Implementing the Nagoya Protocol
In: Implementing the Nagoya Protocol
Comparing Access and Benefit-sharing Regimes in Europe
The adoption of the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit-sharing to the Convention on Biological Diversity in 2010 is a major landmark for the global governance of genetic resources and traditional knowledge. The way in which it will be translated into practice will however depend on the concrete implementation in national country legislation across the world.

Implementing the Nagoya Protocol compares existing ABS regimes in ten European countries, including one non-EU member and one EU candidate country, and critically explores several cross-cutting issues related to the implementation of the Nagoya Protocol in the EU. Gathering some of the most professional and widely acclaimed experts in ABS issues, this book takes a major step towards filling a gap in the vast body of literature on national and regional implementation of global commitments regarding ABS and traditional knowledge.
In: The 2010 Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit-sharing in Perspective