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  • Author or Editor: Garnik Asatrian x
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This essay depicts the details of the history of a well-known Kurdish lexeme on the background of the related forms in Iranian.

In: Iran and the Caucasus
Author:

This is an attempt of tracing an ancient PIr. cultural lexeme in the language of the Talishis, an Iranian people inhabiting the south-western shores of the Caspian Sea, historically known as Talysh or Talyshistan. The term—a unique living remnant of the Old Iranian vocabulary in the whole Western New Iranian expanse (its only cognate in New Persian survived in Classical literature)—belongs to the sphere of syrup-making and denotes primarily date-plum syrup.

In: Iran and the Caucasus
In: Iran and the Caucasus
In: Iran and the Caucasus
In: Iran and the Caucasus
Author:

The paper aims at analysis of the terms denoting “ice” in New Western Iranian dialects. Most of the attested forms reflect NPers. yax. However, an attempt is made to identify several genuine designations of “ice”, which do not fit the common pattern, particularly based on the data obtained from toponymy of the region. In addition, some conjectures regarding the origin of yax are proposed.

In: Iran and the Caucasus
Author:

The article is an attempt to interpret the toponym Bardeskan/Bardaskan, which is the name of a city and a šahrestān (“county”) located in the south of the Khorasan-e Razavi province in Iran, on the northern edge of the Great Salt desert (Kavīr-e namak). Parallelly, the author discusses also the origin of a number of other place-names from the same area.

In: Iran and the Caucasus
In: Iran and the Caucasus
In: Iran and the Caucasus
Author:

The paper is a critical study of the Armenian demonic nomenclature of the ancient and later periods, covering the Classical and Middle Armenian texts and modern dialects, including Western Armenian traditions, which were alive until the first decades of the 20th century among the population of the Armenian provinces of the Ottoman Empire.

The author presents a full list of the Armenian demons of different periods, critically revising the origin of their names and functions on a comparative background.

In: Iran and the Caucasus