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Author: Geoff Gilbert
Author: Geoff Gilbert
This book examines those aspects of the law of extradition which reveal conflicts between different legal systems and where there is a need for an improvement in procedures, either in the interest of mutual legal assistance or for the better protection of the fugitive. The book starts from the assumption that, unless otherwise stated, the principles applied by domestic courts are of universal applicability. Such a broad generalisation is not guaranteed to be right in every circumstance, but it concentrates the study on extradition law itself, rather than on the various national interpretations of domestic extradition laws. The law is stated in accordance with the materials available at 1 December 1990.
Most extradition agreements tend to focus on those matters which form the basis for this book. Throughout the discussion of these matters it will be noticed that there is a tension between extradition law as part of a process of mutual assistance by states in the area of criminal justice, and extradition law as a means of protecting the fugitives' rights and freedoms.
Dr Geoff Gilbert is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Law and a member of the Human Rights Centre at the University of Essex. Within the H.C.R., he teaches International Criminal Law on the LL.M. in International Human Rights.
Author: Geoff Gilbert
Author: Geoff Gilbert

There have been various responses to global warming. More recently, attempts have been made to utilize international criminal law. This article focuses on the criminalization of global warming as it might most directly affect humanity: climate change induced displacement. This article considers how criminalization takes place at the domestic and international levels and the additional constraints with respect to the latter, particularly as regards victims and perpetrators. It then examines how far existing international criminal law, especially as set out in the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, might already apply to climate change induced displacement. Finally, it challenges the appropriateness of further extending international criminal law for this task; criminalizing climate change induced displacement could be “simply too all-encompassing to be meaningful”, helpful or effective.

In: International Criminal Law Review
In: The Challenge of Conflict: International Law Responds
In: The Challenge of Conflict: International Law Responds
In: Responding to International Crime
In: Responding to International Crime
In: Responding to International Crime