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The Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics offers a systematic and comprehensive treatment of all aspects of the history and study of the Hebrew language from its earliest attested form to the present day. The encyclopedia contains overview articles that provide a readable synopsis of current knowledge of the major periods and varieties of the Hebrew language as well as thematically-organized entries which provide further information on individual topics. With over 950 entries and approximately 400 contributing scholars, the Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics is the authoritative reference work for students and researchers in the fields of Hebrew linguistics, general linguistics, Biblical studies, Hebrew and Jewish literature, and related fields.
Features and Benefits: • Search the full text by keyword and Hebrew character set, in addition to advanced search options. • Navigate extensive cross-references via hyperlinks. • Access tertiary treatment of a wide-range of topics such as the Hebrew of various sources (texts, manuscripts, inscriptions, reading traditions), major grammatical features (phonology, morphology, and syntax), lexicon, script and paleography, theoretical linguistic approaches, etc. • Receive annual updates with new articles, images, and multimedia, in particular sound recordings, beginning the year after publication. • Benefit from a synthesis of scholarly research from Israel, Europe, North America, and Asia.
Author: Geoffrey Khan
This work is a detailed documentation of the Neo-Aramaic dialect spoken by Assyrian Christians in the region of Urmi (northwestern-Iran). It consists of four volumes. Volumes 1 and 2 are descriptions of the grammar of the dialect, including the phonology, morphology and syntax. Volume 3 contains a study of the lexicon, consisting of a series of lists of words in various lexical fields and a full dictionary with etymologies. Volume 4 contains transcriptions and translations of oral texts, including folktales and descriptions of culture and history. The Urmi dialect is the most important dialect among the Assyrian Christian communities, since it forms the basis of a widely-used literary form of Neo-Aramaic.
Including a Critical Edition, Translation and Analysis of the Diqduq of ’Abū Ya‘qūb Yūsuf ibn Nūḥ on the Hagiographa
Author: Geoffrey Khan
One of the earliest Karaite grammatical texts that have come down to us from the Middle Ages, is the Diqduq, by ’Abū Ya‘qūb Yūsuf ibn Nūḥ, of Jerusalem. It is a grammatical commentary on the Hebrew Bible.
This volume presents a critical edition of a large section of that Hebrew grammatical text, together with an annotated English translation and a detailed analysis of its contents. The analysis concerns the tradition of Hebrew grammatical thought that was developed in the Middle Ages by grammarians belonging to the Karaite movement of Judaism.
The work is an important contribution to the study of the history of Hebrew grammar and to the study of medieval Jewish thought in general. It brings to light, for the first time, one of the major Hebrew grammatical texts from the tenth century, which predates most of the works of the Spanish school of Hebrew grammar.
Author: Geoffrey Khan
Containing a detailed grammatical description of the spoken Aramaic dialect of the Christian community in the town of Qaraqosh, which lies on the Mosul plain in Northern Iraq, this volume also includes a transcription of oral texts recorded in the dialect.
The grammar is based on extensive fieldwork carried out among native speakers. It consists of sections on phonology, morphology and syntax. There is also a study of semantic fields in the lexicon of the dialect and full glossaries of lexical items.
This Aramaic dialect has never been described before. It is one of the most archaic dialects in group known as North Eastern Neo-Aramaic that contains many features that have not been found in other dialects. These include several lexical elements that are not found in earlier literary Aramaic but can be traced back to Akkadian and Sumerian. Knowledge of the dialect is now being lost among the younger generations, so this volume is an important linguistic record.
Author: Geoffrey Khan
Being direct descendants of the Aramaic spoken by the Jews in antiquity, the still spoken Jewish Neo-Aramaic dialects of Kurdistan deserve special and vivid interest. Geoffrey Khan’s A Grammar of Neo-Aramaic is a unique record of one of these dialects, now on the verge of extinction.
This volume, the result of extensive fieldwork, contains a description of the dialect spoken by the Jews from the region of Arbel (Iraqi Kurdistan), together with a transcription of recorded texts and a glossary.
The grammar consists of sections on phonology, morphology and syntax, preceded by an introductory chapter examining the position of this dialect in relation to the other known Neo-Aramaic dialects. The transcribed texts record folktales and accounts of customs, traditions and experiences of the Jews of Kurdistan.
Author: Geoffrey Khan
This volume contains a detailed grammatical description of the spoken Aramaic dialect of the Jewish communities in the towns of Sulemaniyya and Ḥalabja in North Eastern Iraq. It also includes a transcription of oral texts recorded in the dialect.
The grammar is based on extensive fieldwork carried out among native speakers. It consists of sections on phonology, morphology and syntax. There is also a study of semantic fields in the lexicon of the dialect and full glossaries of lexical items.
This Aramaic dialect, which belongs to the North Eastern Neo-Aramaic group, has never been described before. The Jewish communities left Sulemaniyya and Ḥalabja in the 1950s and the dialect is now on the verge of extinction.
Author: Geoffrey Khan
The Aramaic language has continued to be spoken in various dialects down to modern times. Many of these dialects, however, are now endangered due to political events in the Middle East over the last hundred years. This work, in three volumes, presents a description of one such endangered neo-Aramaic dialect, that of the Assyrian Christian community of the Barwar region in northern Iraq. It is a unique record of the dialect based on interviews with the surviving older generation of the community. Volume one contains a detailed grammatical description of the dialect, including sections on phonology, morphology and syntax. Volume two contains an extensive glossary of the lexicon of the dialect with illustrations of various aspects of the material culture. Volume three contains transcriptions of numerous recorded texts, including folktales, ethnographic texts, songs, and proverbs.
Editor: Geoffrey Khan
This is a Festschrift volume for the British Semitist Edward Ullendorff. It contains papers written by leading scholars in the fields of Semitic philology and Near Eastern history and literature. The contributions are wide-ranging, including linguistic studies of Ethiopian Semitic, Aramaic, Hebrew, Arabic and Greek, also papers on ancient Near Eastern, biblical, Islamic and Ethiopian history and papers on Amharic and Modern Hebrew literature.