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Discrimination on the basis of race, gender or other ascribed group affiliations or individual identities is an all too well-known phenomenon. International instruments are invoked and refined to alter this situation, but often to little avail. In the present volume, authors from across the globe explore the nature and forms of discrimination and seek to establish a new conceptual ground for addressing the issue.
Toleration is often advocated as a remedy for discriminatory practices. In contrast to tolerance, which is seen as an attitude, toleration implies an active engaging of difference. In this volume, several authors address the inherent complexities of the notion itself, not least the implication of asymmetry between the tolerant and the tolerated.
A central theme throughout the volume is the relative force of law and other areas of public concern in addressing the issues of both discrimination and toleration. From a wide range of legal, literary, anthropological, and philosophical perspectives, the authors also show how the role of the intellectual is vital in reshaping the discourse and in redirecting practices that may affirm the equal worth of all humans.
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The present edition of the Human Rights in Development Yearbook is the thirteenth edition in this series. With this volume, the yearbook’s formal structure has shifted from that of a journal to a thematic anthology.
The theme of this year’s volume is “Reparations: Redressing Past Wrongs”. The articles contained in the publication primarily stem from contributions prepared for a conference entitled “The Right to Compensation and Related Remedies for Racial Discrimination” that was hosted by the Danish Centre for Human Rights in April 2001. The conference was organised in anticipation of the World Conference Against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance, which was held in Durban in September 2001. The publication consists of 15 articles divided into four main parts addressing the subjects of “Reparations at the National and Regional Levels”, “Precedence and Standing of International Law”, “The Moral and Social Aspects of Reparation” and “Reflections”.

Human Rights in Development is the result of a joint research project born out of longstanding co-operation between the following research institutes and centres for human rights: the Christian Michelsen Institute, Bergen; the Danish Centre for Human Rights, Copenhagen; the Icelandic Human Rights Centre, Reykjavik; the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Human Rights, Vienna; the International Centre for Human Rights and Democratic Development, Montreal; the Netherlands Institute of Human Rights, Utrecht; the Norwegian Institute of Human Rights, Oslo; the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, Lund and Åbo Academy University, Åbo.

Breytenbach, Cilliers, Hunsinger, George and Köpf, Ulrich

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Michael O’Flaherty, Zdzisław Kędzia, Amrei Müller and George Ulrich

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This collection of essays explores the notion, tools and challenges of human rights diplomacy, which is understood as the utilisation of diplomatic negotiation and persuasion for the specific purpose of promoting and protecting human rights. Theoretical reflections are combined with first-hand accounts from a range of policy-makers involved in human rights diplomacy at the bilateral, regional and multilateral (UN) level. Contributors include inter-governmentally appointed office-holders, human rights ambassadors, members of UN human rights treaty bodies and representatives of inter-governmental organisations, national human rights organisations and non-governmental organisations. Their analysis shows that skilful and principled diplomacy can become a crucial part of a holistic approach to human rights protection, complementing other means such as legal remedies, public advocacy, political pressure and technical assistance. This book builds on discussions at a high-level workshop on the topic, organised by the University of Nottingham Human Rights Law Centre, the European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation and the Adam Mickiewicz University of Poznań.