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Abstract

The goal of this study was to evaluate and compare the short-term performances and the physiological plasticity of two cryptic species Eurytemora carolleeae and Eurytemora affinis (North-Atlantic clade) by simulating rapid advection from freshwater to brackish water conditions and reciprocally. To do so, two reciprocal transplant experiments without acclimation and under non-limited food condition were performed in the St. Lawrence estuarine transition zone during summer 2011. Results revealed that both species diverged in their short-term acclimation response when facing acute salinity changes that they might encounter when advected through the highly dynamic estuarine transition zone. We show that E. carolleeae could use the brackish environment without loss of performance and energy, while E. affinis needed to reallocate energy from other processes (i.e., reproduction) and required food intake to maintain itself in the freshwater environment. In addition, the transplant experiment highlighted that only 40% of the E. affinis showed short term capacity to acclimate to freshwater conditions, indicating that in situ advection by currents from brackish water to fresh water could be dramatic even for a short time period. Furthermore, the survivors of E. affinis in fresh water might not be able to reproduce, which limits establishment of a sustainable population of E. affinis (North-Atlantic clade) in the tidal freshwater part of the estuarine transition zone. Finally, we highlighted for the first time that both species of this pseudocryptic complex could use lipid remodelling to overcome temperature effects on membrane structure, but further studies are needed to determine the influence of membrane lipid remodelling on salinity tolerance.

In: Studies on Eurytemora
In: Studies on Eurytemora
Proceedings of the Eurytemora Conference, St. Petersburg, 2019
This monograph is a summary of the conference on Eurytemora, gathering renowned researchers from all over the world to discuss new advances in Phylogeny, Biogeography, Taxonomy, and Ecology of this important group of estuarine crustaceans, held the 13-17 May 2019 in St. Petersburg, Russia. The present volume includes 17 selected papers, in which you will discover new aspects of the modern theory on the history and recent geographical distribution (biogeography) of an important group of estuarine crustaceans, revealing coincidences with a modern model of continental drift. The researchers suggest a new hypothesis on time and place of origin of continental calanoid copepods. The specialists show that studying external morphology in detail helps to increase identification and differentiation between closely related sibling species within the Eurytemora group. Several ecological questions on invasive and pseudocryptic copepod species are debated. Finally, the last chapter of this monography is devoted to taxa related to the Eurytemora group, Epischura, Temora, Temoropia, and Pseudodiaptomus.

First published as a Special Issue of Crustaceana 93(3-5): 241-547.

Abstract

The goal of this study was to evaluate and compare the short-term performances and the physiological plasticity of two cryptic species Eurytemora carolleeae and Eurytemora affinis (North-Atlantic clade) by simulating rapid advection from freshwater to brackish water conditions and reciprocally. To do so, two reciprocal transplant experiments without acclimation and under non-limited food condition were performed in the St. Lawrence estuarine transition zone during summer 2011. Results revealed that both species diverged in their short-term acclimation response when facing acute salinity changes that they might encounter when advected through the highly dynamic estuarine transition zone. We show that E. carolleeae could use the brackish environment without loss of performance and energy, while E. affinis needed to reallocate energy from other processes (i.e., reproduction) and required food intake to maintain itself in the freshwater environment. In addition, the transplant experiment highlighted that only 40% of the E. affinis showed short term capacity to acclimate to freshwater conditions, indicating that in situ advection by currents from brackish water to fresh water could be dramatic even for a short time period. Furthermore, the survivors of E. affinis in fresh water might not be able to reproduce, which limits establishment of a sustainable population of E. affinis (North-Atlantic clade) in the tidal freshwater part of the estuarine transition zone. Finally, we highlighted for the first time that both species of this pseudocryptic complex could use lipid remodelling to overcome temperature effects on membrane structure, but further studies are needed to determine the influence of membrane lipid remodelling on salinity tolerance.

In: Crustaceana