Series:

Gisle Andersen

Abstract

The Internet represents a continuum from ‘virtually spoken’ to ‘virtually published’ texts. This fact makes it a delightful resource for stylistic variation and for linguistic features that are previously not observed or addressed by linguists. In this paper, I will explore the Internet, as well as a ‘real’ corpus, the BNC, as linguistic resources to shed light on the use of what seems to be a recent phenomenon. The paper deals with the double copula construction, as exemplified by utterances like The bad news is is that you have no control over what font is used. Although this may look like a mere spelling mistake, or in the case of speech, a hesitational feature, several facts suggest that it is neither. As the paper will show, the double copula does occur in both speech and writing, and it tends to occur in particular constructions. The data investigated reveal a systmematicity of co-occurrence that suggests that the repeated instance of is is not as haphazard and random as spelling mistakes or hesitational features.

I argue that recurrent patterns suggest the rise of a new grammatical feature: some speakers tend to repeat the copula before nominal that-clauses in the context of a focus construction, especially after certain nouns with very general meaning, such as thing, issue or point. The double copula is interpreted as a conflation of two different focussing structures, the wh-cleft sentence and clausal subject postponements of the type The thing/issue/question/point is that. Both structures add focus to the information-rich parts of the utterance, at the same time constituting apt strategies for buying processing time while planning the main content of the utterance. The presentation will include a survey of various constructions in which is is occurs, distributional statistical data and suggestions as to the most likely development that this feature involves.

Series:

Gisle Andersen

Abstract

This study investigates how listenership is manifested in a particular discourse setting, namely simulated business negotiation. The study is based on material recorded on video from a corpus of negotiations between international business students. There is a special focus on the interactional placement of backchannels. This refers to the direction of backchannelling between the two teams as well as possible trajectories of listenership signals between the individual interlocutors. The data shows that backchannels are used not only as indicators of listenership across the negotiation table, signalling comprehension vis-à-vis speakers from the opposite team, but also to support co-team members’ utterances and that the pragmatic functions of individual tokens crucially depend on the context of use.

Series:

Edited by Gisle Andersen and Kristin Bech

As its title suggests, this book is a selection of papers that use English corpora to study language variation along three dimensions – time, place and genre. In broad terms, the book aims to bridge the gap between corpus linguistics and sociolinguistics and to increase our knowledge of the characteristics of English language. It includes eleven papers which address a variety of research questions but with the commonality of a corpus-based methodology. Some of the contributions deal with language variation in time, either by looking into historical corpora of English or by adopting the method known as diachronic comparable corpus linguistics, thus illustrating how corpora can be used to illuminate either historical or recent developments of English. Other studies investigate variation in space by comparing different varieties of English, including some of the “New Englishes” such as the South Asian varieties of English. Finally, some of the papers deal with variation in genre, by looking into the use of language for specific purposes through the inspection of medical articles, social reports and academic writing.