Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for

  • Author or Editor: Grant Cooper x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Authors: and

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to examine pre-service teachers’ (PSTs) perceptions of stem education, including their conceptualisations and psychosocial factors associated with teaching it. Methods used to in this study to elicit PSTs’ perceptions included surveys, online responses and drawings. PSTs in this sample commonly conceptualised stem education as involving an integrated approach, placing an emphasis on the relationships between disciplines. PSTs also frequently discussed the importance of developing students’ generic skills, using problem-based learning and inquiry-related pedagogies. Some participants positioned stem education as a way of promoting workforce skills and dispositions in their future students. PSTs generally reported positive attitudes to teaching stem education. They also reported a number of normative influences to teach stem, however there appeared to be limited opportunities to develop their teaching capacity on professional experience in schools. Relatively low levels of self-efficacy to teach particular areas of stem were reported by PSTs, particularly engineering and digital technologies. This paper contributes to debates on calls for reform to teacher education programs and discourses about PSTs perceptions of stem education.

In: STEM Education: An Emerging Field of Inquiry
Authors: and

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to examine pre-service teachers’ (PSTs) perceptions of stem education, including their conceptualisations and psychosocial factors associated with teaching it. Methods used to in this study to elicit PSTs’ perceptions included surveys, online responses and drawings. PSTs in this sample commonly conceptualised stem education as involving an integrated approach, placing an emphasis on the relationships between disciplines. PSTs also frequently discussed the importance of developing students’ generic skills, using problem-based learning and inquiry-related pedagogies. Some participants positioned stem education as a way of promoting workforce skills and dispositions in their future students. PSTs generally reported positive attitudes to teaching stem education. They also reported a number of normative influences to teach stem, however there appeared to be limited opportunities to develop their teaching capacity on professional experience in schools. Relatively low levels of self-efficacy to teach particular areas of stem were reported by PSTs, particularly engineering and digital technologies. This paper contributes to debates on calls for reform to teacher education programs and discourses about PSTs perceptions of stem education.

In: STEM Education: An Emerging Field of Inquiry

Abstract

With the advancement of immersive virtual reality (VR) there are various possibilities with the introduction of these technologies. Preparing students to effectively navigate, contribute to, and participate in virtual environments appears to be an important set of stem-related competencies in the future. This chapter describes the VR Education Model (VEM), describing elements of this technology and its possible application in the classroom. One factor in student underachievement in stem subjects may be a heavy reliance upon textual representations at the expense of more visuo spatial representations. Therefore, the use of VR may be particularly beneficial when representing and learning about stem-related concepts. The authors envisage a number of scenarios that include but are not limited to the possibilities described in this chapter. The implementation of VR is discussed in terms of a broader stem vision that meets the unique needs and priorities of each school.

In: STEM Education: An Emerging Field of Inquiry

Abstract

With the advancement of immersive virtual reality (VR) there are various possibilities with the introduction of these technologies. Preparing students to effectively navigate, contribute to, and participate in virtual environments appears to be an important set of stem-related competencies in the future. This chapter describes the VR Education Model (VEM), describing elements of this technology and its possible application in the classroom. One factor in student underachievement in stem subjects may be a heavy reliance upon textual representations at the expense of more visuo spatial representations. Therefore, the use of VR may be particularly beneficial when representing and learning about stem-related concepts. The authors envisage a number of scenarios that include but are not limited to the possibilities described in this chapter. The implementation of VR is discussed in terms of a broader stem vision that meets the unique needs and priorities of each school.

In: STEM Education: An Emerging Field of Inquiry

Abstract

In this research the authors explore ClasSimVR, a proof-of-concept immersive virtual reality (ivr) application. This software is designed to support pre-service teachers (psts) implementation of a School-Wide Positive Behaviour Interventions and Supports (swpbis) approach to challenging student behaviours. ClasSimVR offers users the opportunity to engage with immersive hypothetical scenarios, whereby virtual students display challenging behaviours. Users respond to these behaviours with a range of possible actions aligned with a swpbis approach. The authors draw on a research-through-design (rtd) methodology to explore the design process of ClasSimVR. The article investigates the implications of an expert evaluation (n=5) conducted as part of the design process of creating ClasSimVR. More broadly, this research contributes to the discourse surrounding the design and implementation of immersive learning environments in educational contexts.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Volume Editors: , , and
The second decade of the 21st century has seen governments and industry globally intensify their focus on the role of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) as a vehicle for future economic prosperity. Economic opportunities for new industries that are emerging from technological advances, such as those emerging from the field of artificial intelligence also require greater capabilities in science, mathematics, engineering and technologies. In response to such opportunities and challenges, government policies that position STEM as a critical driver of economic prosperity have burgeoned in recent years. Common to all these policies are consistent messages that STEM related industries are the key to future international competitiveness, productivity and economic prosperity.
This book presents a contemporary focus on significant issues in STEM teaching, learning and research that are valuable in preparing students for a digital 21st century. The book chapters cover a wide spectrum of issues and topics using a wealth of research methodologies and methods ranging from STEM definitions to virtual reality in the classroom; multiplicative thinking; STEM in pre-school, primary, secondary and tertiary education, opportunities and obstacles in STEM; inquiry-based learning in statistics; values in STEM education and building academic leadership in STEM.
The book is an important representation of some of the work currently being done by research-active academics. It will appeal to academics, researchers, teacher educators, educational administrators, teachers and anyone interested in contemporary STEM Education related research in a rapidly changing globally interconnected world.

Contributors are: Natalie Banks, Anastasios (Tasos) Barkatsas, Amanda Berry, Lisa Borgerding, Nicky Carr, Io Keong Cheong, Grant Cooper, Jan van Driel, Jennifer Earle, Susan Fraser, Noleine Fitzallen, Tricia Forrester, Helen Georgiou, Andrew Gilbert, Ineke Henze, Linda Hobbs, Sarah Howard, Sylvia Sao Leng Ieong, Chunlian Jiang, Kathy Jordan, Belinda Kennedy, Zsolt Lavicza, Tricia Mclaughlin, Wendy Nielsen, Shalveena Prasad, Theodosia Prodromou, Wee Tiong Seah, Dianne Siemon, Li Ping Thong, Tessa E. Vossen and Marc J. de Vries.

Abstract

This chapter reports a research project aimed to develop pre-service science teachers’ knowledge and understanding of contemporary stem contexts and pedagogies through participation in a stem mentoring initiative for schoolgirls. In this project, primary and secondary pre-service teachers (PSTs) volunteered to work as mentors, collaborating in the design of learning experiences suitable for school-aged girls, together with teacher educators and researchers in stem at an Australian University. Outcomes of the study focus on main themes of: PSTs’ self-perceptions as emerging stem educators, their understandings of stem and developing a pedagogy around stem, their understandings of school girls’ interest, engagement and learning in stem, and the value of the project for teachers in preparation.

In: STEM Education: An Emerging Field of Inquiry

Abstract

This chapter reports a research project aimed to develop pre-service science teachers’ knowledge and understanding of contemporary stem contexts and pedagogies through participation in a stem mentoring initiative for schoolgirls. In this project, primary and secondary pre-service teachers (PSTs) volunteered to work as mentors, collaborating in the design of learning experiences suitable for school-aged girls, together with teacher educators and researchers in stem at an Australian University. Outcomes of the study focus on main themes of: PSTs’ self-perceptions as emerging stem educators, their understandings of stem and developing a pedagogy around stem, their understandings of school girls’ interest, engagement and learning in stem, and the value of the project for teachers in preparation.

In: STEM Education: An Emerging Field of Inquiry
In: STEM Education: An Emerging Field of Inquiry
In: STEM Education: An Emerging Field of Inquiry