Editor: Guus Kroonen
Author: Guus Kroonen
The Germanic languages, which include English, German, Dutch and Scandinavian, belong to the best-studied languages in the world, but the picture of their parent language, Proto-Germanic, continues to evolve. This new etymological dictionary offers a wealth of material collected from old and new Germanic sources, ranging from Gothic to Elfdalian, from Old English to the Swiss dialects, and incorporates several important advances in Proto-Germanic phonology, morphology and derivation. With its approximately 2,800 headwords and at least as many derivations, it covers the larger part of the Proto-Germanic vocabulary, and attempts to trace it back to its Proto-Indo-European foundations. The result is a landmark etymological study indispensable to Indo-Europeanists and Germanicists, as well as to the non-specialist.
Author: Guus Kroonen
The n-stems are an intriguing part of Proto-Germanic morphology. Unlike any other noun class, the n-stems have roots that are characterized by systematic consonant and vowel alternations across the different Germanic dialects. This monograph represents a diachronic investigation of this root variation. It traces back the Germanic n-stems to their Indo-European origin, and clarifies their formal characteristics by an interaction of sound law and analogy. This book therefore is not just an attempt to account for the typology of the Germanic n-stems, but also a case study of the impact that sound change may have on the evolution of morphology and derivation.
Author: Guus Kroonen

In Germanic, the Proto-Indo-European accusative of the feminine demonstrative, i.e. *, emerges in two different forms: Gothic versus Old Norse and Old English . Since PIE * regularly gives *ō in Germanic, it is usually assumed that the reflex developed out of * through an unstressed stage. But this view was recently questioned by Peter Schrijver. He argued that the merger of *ā and *ō was forestalled in North West Germanic by a tautosyllabic nasal, and that therefore must be regular. This solution seems to be contradicted by Faroese, however, where the demonstrative form is . This may continue an Old Norse variant with a short vowel, and thus seems to indicate that PNWGm. indeed developed out of * through an unstressed form, viz. *.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
In: The Proto-Germanic n-stems
In: The Proto-Germanic n-stems
In: The Proto-Germanic n-stems
In: The Proto-Germanic n-stems