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Author: Hans Olsson

Abstract

Today, spiritual warfare is an increasingly prominent feature within Pentecostal-Charismatic Christianity in Africa. This chapter assesses the significance spiritual warfare has gained in the predominantly Muslim context of Zanzibar. By focusing on how narratives of spiritual war shape migrant Pentecostals’ interpretations of violence experienced in 2012, and how spiritual warfare can be seen to produce a public culture, the chapter addresses how spiritual practice becomes entangled in a complex socio-political field in which religious and ethno-national sites of belonging intermingle. It highlights the implications of Pentecostals’ aspirations for social change and the publicity inherent in the hermeneutics of spiritual warfare.

Open Access
In: Faith in African Lived Christianity
Author: Hans Olsson

This article explores the quest among contemporary pentecostal migrants from mainland Tanzania in Zanzibar to become “saved” Christians. The analysis of a set of techniques and processes applied in developing and keeping faith reveals high levels of suspicion and doubt connected to the perceived presence of evil in the Zanzibari environment, which, in turn, is linked to a fear of losing salvation. With Christian minorities recently having their premises attacked in connection with sociopolitical hostilities in the predominantly Muslim setting of Zanzibar, the case in this article highlights how the context of violence is negotiated in pentecostal modes of suspicion toward the other while, at the same time, it bolsters spiritual growth. This illustrates how a pentecostal ethos intermingles with and provides migrants with ways of interpreting the contemporary setting in which religious belonging is at the fore in present-day calls for Zanzibari political sovereignty and inclusive Union politics.

In: Pneuma
Author: Hans Olsson

Abstract

Today, spiritual warfare is an increasingly prominent feature within Pentecostal-Charismatic Christianity in Africa. This chapter assesses the significance spiritual warfare has gained in the predominantly Muslim context of Zanzibar. By focusing on how narratives of spiritual war shape migrant Pentecostals’ interpretations of violence experienced in 2012, and how spiritual warfare can be seen to produce a public culture, the chapter addresses how spiritual practice becomes entangled in a complex socio-political field in which religious and ethno-national sites of belonging intermingle. It highlights the implications of Pentecostals’ aspirations for social change and the publicity inherent in the hermeneutics of spiritual warfare.

Open Access
In: Faith in African Lived Christianity
In: Jesus for Zanzibar: Narratives of Pentecostal (Non-)Belonging, Islam, and Nation
In: Jesus for Zanzibar: Narratives of Pentecostal (Non-)Belonging, Islam, and Nation
In: Jesus for Zanzibar: Narratives of Pentecostal (Non-)Belonging, Islam, and Nation
In: Jesus for Zanzibar: Narratives of Pentecostal (Non-)Belonging, Islam, and Nation
In: Jesus for Zanzibar: Narratives of Pentecostal (Non-)Belonging, Islam, and Nation
In: Jesus for Zanzibar: Narratives of Pentecostal (Non-)Belonging, Islam, and Nation
In: Jesus for Zanzibar: Narratives of Pentecostal (Non-)Belonging, Islam, and Nation