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Abstract

The article adduces reasons in support of the view that the famous Schøyen Copper Scroll does not come from Afghanistan (Bactria), as maintained by its editor Gudrun Melzer, but belongs to the land south of the Hindu Kush. The donation of a Buddhist Stūpa, recorded in the scroll, was officially made by the Devaputra King of Tālagāna, which may have been a place in the Panjab. It is argued, however, that this pious foundation was organized in particular by his Queen, who is said to have been the daughter of the King of Sārada. The first person speaking in the last 7 verses of the inscription may be identified as this Queen of Tālagāna, who speaks of her homecountry, indicating that the donated Stūpa was erected in the land of Sārada. The village in which the Stūpa was erected is called Śārdīysa. This village, it is argued, can be identified with the present-day village of Śārdi in the Neelum Valley of Kashmir. This region of Kashmir was controlled by the Hūṇa (Alchon) king Mehama, under whose rule the foundation is said to have taken place. The Alchon kings Khīṅgīla and Toramāna may have been mentioned in the scroll on account of their control over Gandhāra and the Panjab, in which the donor institution of Tālagāna was situated. The fourth Alchon king mentioned in the scroll, Javūkha, probably reigned in the Swat Valley. These four Alchon kings formed a confederacy, well-known from their common coinage. The scroll evinces that they were involved in the patronage of Buddhism.

In: Indo-Iranian Journal
Studies in the Cultural History of India
Author:
The 31 selected and revised articles in the volume Holy Ground: Where Art and Text Meet, written by Hans Bakker between 1986 and 2016, vary from theoretical subjects to historical essays on the classical culture of India. They combine two mainstreams: the Sanskrit textual tradition, including epigraphy, and the material culture as expressed in works of religious art and iconography. The study of text and art in close combination in the actual field where they meet provides a great potential for understanding. The history of holy places is therefore one of the leitmotivs that binds these studies together.
One article, "The Ramtek Inscriptions II", was co-authored by Harunaga Isaacson, two articles, on "Moksadharma 187 and 239–241" and "The Quest for the Pasupata Weapon," by Peter C. Bisschop.
In: Indo-Iranian Journal
Editor:
The Groningen Oriental Studies publishes scholarly works in the field of classical Indology since 1986. The series is published under the auspices of the J. Gonda Foundation (Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences). It focuses on philological works, critical editions of texts in Sanskrit and New Indo-Aryan languages, as well as text-related studies. From 2013 onwards the series will be merged with the Gonda Indological Studies (GIS), which focuses on monographs and collected volumes on topics such as the (cultural) history, material culture, literature, languages, philosophy and religions of South Asia.
In the Supplement to the Groningen Oriental Studies (GOSS) appears the critical edition and study of the Skandapurāṇa.

In: The Vākāṭakas
In: The Vākāṭakas
In: The Vākāṭakas
In: The Vākāṭakas
In: The Vākāṭakas