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Notarii en Exceptores

Een onderzoek naar rol en betekenis van notarii en exceptores in dienst van overheid en kerk in de Romeinse keizertijd (tot circa 450 A.D.)

Hans C. Teitler

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Notarii and exceptores

An inquiry into role and significance of shorthand writers in the Imperial and ecclesiastical bureaucracy of the Roman Empire (from the Early Principate to c. 450 A.D.)

Hans C. Teitler

In 411 AD an ecclesiastical conference was held in Carthage under the presidency of Flavius Marcellinus, tribunus et notarius. On that occasion exceptores and notarii ecclesiastici acted as shorthand writers. Thus at this conference we meet three species of one genus at different stages of their development: a tribunus et notarius, a high imperial official who, despite his title, probably did not know how to write shorthand; exceptores, minor civil servants working in public offices who were certainly stenographers at the time and notarii ecclesiastici, ecclesiastical bureaucrats whose task at the Carthaginian conference was to assist the exceptores with their work, but who at other times were more like tribuni et notarii. With the situation in 411 AD as a starting point an attempt is made to sketch the role and significance of notarii and exceptores in the Roman Empire, from the Early Principate to circa 450 AD.
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Edited by den Boeft, Jan Willem Drijvers, den Hengst and Hans Teitler

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Jan den Boeft, Jan Willem Drijvers, Daniël den Hengst and Hans C. Teitler

The first part of Book 30 of Ammianus Marcellinus’ Res Gestae is devoted to the military and diplomatic struggle for Armenia between Valens, emperor of the East, and king Sapor II of Persia. The Romans successfully defend their position, until they are forced to deal with the Goths who threaten to cross the Danube border. The second half of Book 30 is dominated by Valentinian I, emperor of the West. Ammianus presents a kaleidoscopic picture of this emperor alternating between admiration for his military qualities and devotion to his duty and bitter criticism of his avarice and cruelty. The account of his death forms the conclusion of Ammianus’ treatment of the history of the western half of the Empire.
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Jan den Boeft, Jan Willem Drijvers, Daniël den Hengst and Hans C. Teitler

Book 27 deals with events between 365 and 370. Military operations in the western and eastern half of the Empire take up a large part of the available space. Apart from military matters Ammianus deals with internal affairs. He discusses the terms of office of four Roman urban prefects and paints a picture of Petronius Probus, the mightiest civil official of the period. The most striking part of the book contains a portrait of the emperor Valentinian. This passage forms the centre of the book, which therefore has the structure of a triptych: of the two outer parts each contains military affairs in the West and the East and reports on some notable non-military events, whilst in the central panel Valentinian takes pride of place.
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Jan den Boeft, Jan Willem Drijvers, Daniël den Hengst and Hans C. Teitler

This commentary is the fifth volume in a series of commentaries on the fourth-century historian Ammianus Marcellinus, which continues the commentaries by P. de Jonge on Books XIV-IXX. In XXIV the Persian expedition of Julian is described, from its successful start until the failure to take the capital Ctesiphon. The commentary deals both with the philological, literary and linguistic problems in the Latin text and with the historical and geographical details that are necessary for an understanding of the course of events. Special attention is given to the author’s highly personal involvement as a participant in the expedition.
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Jan den Boeft, Jan Willem Drijvers, Daniël den Hengst and Hans Teitler

In Book 28 Ammianus describes the military activity of Valentinian on the Rhine. The historian speaks with admiration about his efforts to strengthen the northwestern border of the empire. He shows a similar esteem for the general Theodosius, who re-established order in Britain. However, in the greater part of Book 28 there is an air of gloom. Ammianus writes reluctantly about the judicial terror inflicted on the Roman aristocracy by powerful magistrates. In his digression about Roman manners he speaks with contempt about the senatorial elite and the Roman plebs, because they fail to live up to the standards of their ancestors. The final chapter illustrates the disastrous effects of the mismanagement of the province of Tripolis by corrupt officials.
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Edited by Jan den Boeft, Jan Willem Drijvers, Daniël den Hengst and Hans Teitler

Book 26 of Ammianus' Res Gestae is the first of the hexad which deals with the rule of the emperors Valentinian and Valens (364-378). In the first five chapters Ammianus describes the election of Valentinian, who appointed his brother Valens as his co-ruler, and subsequently divided the empire into an eastern and a western part. The next chapters deal with the revolt of Procopius. They offer the most detailed account of a coup d' état in Roman historiography. The memory of Julian, whose death was the central theme of the preceding book, is still very much alive. None of the three protagonists of Book 26 was remotely his equal. His loss meant a turn for the worse in the history of Rome.