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  • Author or Editor: Hans Van Gossum x
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Abstract

Sex-limited polymorphism is widely distributed among animal taxa, but has only rarely been studied from a macro-evolutionary perspective. We investigate the evolution of female-limited polymorphism by mapping presence or absence of multiple discrete morphs on published phylogenetic trees for North American representatives of two damselfly genera. The results indicate that female polymorphy represents the ancestral condition based on the species included with subsequent loss and monomorphy representing the evolutionary end-point in most cases. According to one phylogeny, character optimization suggests that expression of the polymorphism may be lost (to a state of monomorphy) and gained again (back to polymorphy). Earlier work indicated that changes from polymorphy to monomorphy might be coupled with evolution of the mating system from polyandry to monandry. The results presented here, however, do not convincingly support such view.

In: Animal Biology

Abstract

Rearing damselflies under laboratory conditions is a promising means of solving a variety of biological questions. Therefore, in order to improve the success of future researchers we felt the need to indicate potential difficulties in carrying out rearing experiments. Laboratory crosses were obtained using virgin animals originating from natural populations in Belgium and Spain. Resulting offspring was maintained, under laboratory conditions, in small aquaria until emergence and in insectaries as adults. Our results show that keeping damselflies during their entire life cycle under artificial conditions can be very difficult. We suggest that future researchers should change water regularly, supply sufficient food, and rear animals at low density or even individually. Furthermore, suggestions are given on type of food, advisable laboratory conditions and female oviposition methodology.

In: Animal Biology

Abstract

Sex-limited colour polymorphism occurs in several animal taxa and is usually explained in the context of sexual selection. Specifically, for polymorphism restricted to the female sex, multiple phenotypes may have evolved in response to male harassment. Such male harassment is generally considered to entail differential costs to female morphs, which may ultimately result in fitness differences. However, contrary to this prediction, most previous studies do not support that female morphs (andromorphs and heteromorphs) differ in measures of quality and (or) fitness components. In this study, we evaluate quality and fitness differences between mated female morphs of the damselfly Enallagma cyathigerum. We suggest that many earlier studies may have failed to observe morph differences in quality or fitness because selection by male harassment was weak. Here, we selected a study population for which our expectation was that levels of per female capita male harassment were high. Nevertheless, also in this population mated female morphs did not differ in body size or condition (body mass/body length). However, mated female morphs did differ in levels of developmental instability: heteromorphs consistently showed a higher level of fluctuating asymmetry than andromorphs. Also, mated female morphs differed in fecundity: andromorphs had a lower clutch size than heteromorphs. In addition, larger females contained more eggs, but the slope of this relationship was steeper in heteromorphs. In conclusion, mated female morphs of the damselfly E. cyathigerum at our study site clearly differed in one quality estimate (developmental instability) and in our measure of fitness (fecundity).

In: Animal Biology

Abstract

In many damselfly species a female-limited colour polymorphism is encountered which is assumed to be the result of sexual conflict. Typically, one morph resembles the male's body colouration (andromorph), while the other is dissimilar (heteromorph). Little is known about the extent of temporal variation in female morph proportions at the water where mating occurs. Knowledge about such variation should help to identify the factors that affect female morph proportion and the scales at which these factors operate. The objective of this study is to assess the occurrence of diurnal and seasonal variation in female morph proportions at the water for the damselfly Enallagma cyathigerum. Diurnal variation was evaluated at six nearby populations, while seasonal variation was examined at one of these populations. Furthermore, we considered temporal variation in female morph proportion in relation to proxies of male harassment (i.e., male density and operational sex ratio). Our findings indicate that female morph proportion varies throughout a day but is uniform on a seasonal scale. Variation in female morph proportions could not be explained by concomitant variation in male density or operational sex ratio. We suggest future study of male mate choice may consider temporal variation in female morph proportions at the water.

In: Animal Biology

Abstract

Female-limited polymorphism occurs in different animal taxa but is particularly abundant among species of damselflies (Insecta: Odonata), most likely as a consequence of selection to avoid excessive male harassment. Recent work on the damselfly Nehalennia irene indicated that within year spatial variation in female morph frequencies was limited in nearby populations (i.e. intra-regional scale), but large at a continental scale. As anticipated, some of the observed variation in morph frequency was correlated with variation in the estimated degree of male harassment towards female morphs, measured by male density and operational sex ratio. Here, we extended earlier work by quantifying variation in morph frequency over two to three years, allowing us to elucidate how morph frequencies vary temporally at both intra-regional and continental scales (data for 8 populations over three years and for 33 populations over two years, respectively). Annual variation in morph frequencies was relatively high at the intra-regional scale, but was never large enough to obscure the underlying spatial pattern at the continental scale. At both geographic scales, male density and operational sex ratio were highly variable between years. The estimated degree of male harassment correlated with variation in morph frequency within some regions, but not all. Together, the observed natural variation in female morph frequencies may be partly explained by variation in male harassment, but it appears that a complete understanding will require considering the role of other environmental factors.

In: Animal Biology