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Abstract

Pacific Island Countries have limited capacity to engage in scientific research involving marine genetic resources in areas beyond national jurisdiction (abnj). Marine scientific research and capacity development are central to the regime for technology transfer established by the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (losc), but gaps and ambiguities weaken this framework. In this article, options to strengthen scientific capacity in Pacific Island Countries, through the development of a new international legally binding instrument for the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity in abnj under the losc, are examined. The international framework for technology transfer could be strengthened by fostering an integrated approach to the advancement, sharing and application of scientific knowledge. Coordination and collaboration at global and regional levels will be required to increase marine science cooperation, improve access to data and information, deliver training, and overcome barriers to develop institutional and individual scientific capacity.

In: The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law

Abstract

Pacific Island Countries have limited capacity to engage in scientific research involving marine genetic resources in areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ). Marine scientific research and capacity development are central to the regime for technology transfer established by the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (LOSC), but gaps and ambiguities weaken this framework. In this article, options to strengthen scientific capacity in Pacific Island Countries, through the development of a new international legally binding instrument for the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity in ABNJ under the LOSC, are examined. The international framework for technology transfer could be strengthened by fostering an integrated approach to the advancement, sharing and application of scientific knowledge. Coordination and collaboration at global and regional levels will be required to increase marine science cooperation, improve access to data and information, deliver training, and overcome barriers to develop institutional and individual scientific capacity.

In: Conserving Biodiversity in Areas beyond National Jurisdiction

Abstract

unga Resolution 69/292 requires that the development of an international legally binding instrument (ilbi) for the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction (abnj) under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea should not undermine existing relevant legal instruments and frameworks and relevant global, regional and sectoral bodies. The South West Pacific regional oceans governance framework is reviewed, highlighting the importance of dedicated mechanisms for cooperation in the integration of regional institutions and in collective diplomacy for the development of an ilbi. It is argued a sufficiently inclusive description of existing arrangements under an ilbi is needed to not undermine the competence or integration of the regional architecture for oceans’ governance. Shared governance principles between an ilbi and existing regional governance architecture could play an important role in preserving coherence and contribute to ensuring regional standards for conservation of bbnj are not diminished.

In: The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law