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Author: Harry Vredeveld
As the University of Erfurt collapsed in the early 1520s, Hessus faced losing his livelihood. To cope, he imagined himself a shape-changing Proteus. Transforming first into a lawyer, then a physician, he finally became a teacher at the Nuremberg academy organized by Philip Melanchthon. Volume 5 traces this story via Hessus's poems of 1524-1528: "Some Rules for Preserving Good Health" (1524; 1531), with attached "Praise of Medicine" and two sets of epigrams; "Three Elegies" (1526), two praising the Nuremberg school and one attacking a criticaster; "Venus Triumphant" (1527), with poems on Joachim Camerarius’s wedding; "Against the Hypocrisy of the Monastic Habit" (1527), with four Psalm paraphrases; and "Seventeen Bucolic Idyls" (1528), updating the "Bucolicon" of 1509 and adding five idyls.
Editor: Harry Vredeveld
This volume of the Amsterdam edition of the Latin texts of Erasmus contains a critical edition of the Latin poems of Erasmus, offering a new chronology of these poems and of Erasmus’ life. The critical edition of the Latin texts is accompanied by a general introduction in English and introductions and annotations to each poem, clarifying the work’s linguistic, philological, historical and theological background, and identifying parallels and sources.
Author: Harry Vredeveld
Hailed as “King of Poets” by Johann Reuchlin in 1514, Eobanus Hessus (1488–1540) was eager to build on his fame with a stream of new works: “Easter Hymn,” “On True Nobility,” “On the Avoidance of Drunkenness,” “Response from His Majesty Maximilian” (answering Hutten’s “Letter from Italia”), and the short epic “Christ’s Victory over the Underworld,” as well as a hitherto unknown “Inaugural Lecture” on Cicero and Plautus. In 1515 he anonymously published a mock-quodlibetical speech that applies the scholastic method of argumentation to “The Species of Drunkards.” Eobanus’ first bestseller, this brilliant satire was reprinted well into the eighteenth century. All of these texts are included in the present volume, along with annotated translations, ground-breaking introductions, and commentary.
Volume 4: Between Erasmus and Luther, 1518–1524
Author: Harry Vredeveld
In this volume, Eobanus Hessus turns from passionate Erasmian into staunch defender of Luther, only to find himself caught in the no-man’s-land between the two titans. Under Erasmus’ spell, he writes "Itinerary of My Journey to Erasmus," "On the Restoration of Studies at Erfurt," epigrams against Edward Lee, and "Short Preface to the 'Enchiridion.'" Changing course in 1521, he publishes "Elegies in Praise and Defense of Luther" and "Letter of the Afflicted Church to Luther." Thereafter, amid tumults and academic collapse, he battles the radical preachers in "Some Letters of Illustrious Men Concerning the More Humane Studies" and "Three Dialogues." Two elegies serve as intermezzos: a "Consolation" to the imprisoned William of Brunswick and a patriotic "Invective" against Johannes Dantiscus.
In: Daphnis
Author: Harry Vredeveld

These philological notes are intended to supplement my earlier article: Materials for a New Commentary to Sebastian Brant's Narrenschiff. In: Daphnis 26 (1997), pp. 553-651.

In: Daphnis
In: Daphnis
In: Daphnis