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Chapter 12 Participatory Action Research on Education for Self-Reliance for Rural Youth in Indonesia

Abstract

Based on the author’s educational and Participatory Action Research (PAR) engagement in a remote mountainous village in South Sulawesi, Eastern Indonesia, this chapter reflects on educational practices that can initiate self-reliance activities and projects in a rural community in Indonesia. The chapter begins with a brief conceptual genealogy of the education for self-reliance (ESR) and Participatory Action Research (PAR) to show the pertinent of the methodology adopted in this inquiry. The next section discusses the analysis on learning, schooling processes, content and organisation of formal education, learning spaces in the rural community, vision on education and the self-reliant practices in that village. The last segment discusses potentials and traits of education for self-reliance for the rural community, particularly in dealing with challenges of the deskilling of youth, and in attracting as well as retaining rural youth in the agricultural sector. This study argues that ESR can address the problem of the deskilling of rural youth and can contribute to their economic sustainability. The analysis shows how entrepreneurship and life skills education could be counterproductive when the obstacles to education for self-reliance, as rooted in factors contributing to the diminishing of rural youth agency, are not appropriately considered and addressed.

In: Preparing Indonesian Youth

Abstract

Based on the author’s educational and Participatory Action Research (PAR) engagement in a remote mountainous village in South Sulawesi, Eastern Indonesia, this chapter reflects on educational practices that can initiate self-reliance activities and projects in a rural community in Indonesia. The chapter begins with a brief conceptual genealogy of the education for self-reliance (ESR) and Participatory Action Research (PAR) to show the pertinent of the methodology adopted in this inquiry. The next section discusses the analysis on learning, schooling processes, content and organisation of formal education, learning spaces in the rural community, vision on education and the self-reliant practices in that village. The last segment discusses potentials and traits of education for self-reliance for the rural community, particularly in dealing with challenges of the deskilling of youth, and in attracting as well as retaining rural youth in the agricultural sector. This study argues that ESR can address the problem of the deskilling of rural youth and can contribute to their economic sustainability. The analysis shows how entrepreneurship and life skills education could be counterproductive when the obstacles to education for self-reliance, as rooted in factors contributing to the diminishing of rural youth agency, are not appropriately considered and addressed.

In: Preparing Indonesian Youth
Part 3 Youth, Schooling, and Social Context of Education
In: Preparing Indonesian Youth
Part 2 School and Institutional Practices
In: Preparing Indonesian Youth
Part 1 Teachers and Teaching
In: Preparing Indonesian Youth
A Review of Educational Research
Preparing Indonesian Youth: A Review of Educational Research offers insights into the challenges and prospects in preparing Indonesian youth for 21st century living. The chapters feature empirically-based case studies focusing on three key aspects of education in Indonesia: teachers and teaching; school practices, programs, and innovations; and the social contexts of youth and schooling.

The case studies also represent different vantage points contributing to an enriched understanding of how larger social phenomenon—for example, education decentralisation in Indonesia, (rural-urban and transnational) migration, international benchmarking assessments, and the global feminist and women’s movement—impact and interact with enacted visions of preparing all youth educationally for work, as well as for meaningful participation in their respective communities and the Indonesian society at large.

Contributors are: Anindito Aditomo, Hasriadi Masalam, Juliana Murniati, Ahmad Bukhori Muslim, Wahyu Nurhayati, Shuki Osman, Margaretha Purwanti, Esti Rahayu, Ila Rosmilawati, Andrew Rosser, Widjajanti M. Santoso, Anne Suryani, Aries Sutantoputra, Novita W. Sutantoputri, Isabella Tirtowalujo, Nina Widyawati and David Wright.    
Chapter 1 Preparing Youth for Indonesia 4.0

Abstract

The introductory chapter recognises firstly the prevalence and uses of the “Indonesia 4.0” discourse in directing attention to whether and how youths in Indonesia are both benefiting and underserved educationally. This chapter frames the studies in the book from a macro perspective of the education system, as contributing to conversations on a range of issues toward preparing Indonesian youth for the envisioned present and future pertaining to: educational participation, quality, and equity; teaching and learning; and youth’s skills and employment. The book highlights cases that emphasise, critique, and delineate progresses, as well as new and persisting challenges. This chapter proposes ways the empirical studies contribute with insights to especially three aspects of the education system: teachers and teaching; programs and curricular offering in education especially at the secondary and tertiary levels; and the social and cultural contexts of education implicating youth’s encounters with schooling and educational experiences. This chapter foregrounds that the case studies bring into their analyses how larger social forces and phenomena—for example, political and education decentralisation, internal rural-urban and transnational migration, and the global feminist and women’s movement—shape and interact with visions of preparing all Indonesian youth for meaningful participation in the society.

In: Preparing Indonesian Youth
In: Preparing Indonesian Youth
In: Preparing Indonesian Youth

Abstract

The introductory chapter recognises firstly the prevalence and uses of the “Indonesia 4.0” discourse in directing attention to whether and how youths in Indonesia are both benefiting and underserved educationally. This chapter frames the studies in the book from a macro perspective of the education system, as contributing to conversations on a range of issues toward preparing Indonesian youth for the envisioned present and future pertaining to: educational participation, quality, and equity; teaching and learning; and youth’s skills and employment. The book highlights cases that emphasise, critique, and delineate progresses, as well as new and persisting challenges. This chapter proposes ways the empirical studies contribute with insights to especially three aspects of the education system: teachers and teaching; programs and curricular offering in education especially at the secondary and tertiary levels; and the social and cultural contexts of education implicating youth’s encounters with schooling and educational experiences. This chapter foregrounds that the case studies bring into their analyses how larger social forces and phenomena—for example, political and education decentralisation, internal rural-urban and transnational migration, and the global feminist and women’s movement—shape and interact with visions of preparing all Indonesian youth for meaningful participation in the society.

In: Preparing Indonesian Youth