Editors: Ralf Koerrenz and Hazel Slinn
[International Board: Roger Behrens (Germany), Mirka Dickel (Germany), Norm Friesen (USA), Alex Lautensach (Canada), Euler R. Westphal (Brazil)]

The book series “Culture and Education” includes publications about both the theory and the practical implementation of education. The volumes are selected with regards to the manifold connections among different understandings of culture. At a time of the ongoing quantification and numerical comparison of education processes, the publications of this series share the idea that education is a fundamental and anthropological element of man’s culture. The different volumes of this series focus on the idea that the human being is inseparably connected to, and even dependent with and on, learning. However, learning is always realized in specific cultural contexts.
Examples of this are the relationships between education and religion, education and literature, education and politics or education and aesthetics. With this plurality of possible connections in mind, the series broaches the issue of the relationship between culture and education with regards to three distinct methodological approaches.
First, the series includes work on foundational research that becomes manifest in publications about the philosophy of education. Second, the series includes publications on fundamental ideas of education and their realization in different historical constellations and/or significant works on educational theory. Third, the series includes publications which address the relationship between culture and education from a comparative perspective. These volumes attempt to broaden the intercultural discussion on learning as an anthropological constant.
Education, Crisis, Diachronicity and the Transition to a Sustainable Future
This work contributes to education for sustainability with innovative pedagogy and a new conceptual approach. It is based on a realistic assessment of our future in the Anthropocene, based on principles of human security and scientific models of remaining safe operating space. It critiques current approaches to education for sustainability and highlights solutions.
A chapter on the ethics of sustainability education provides the conceptual basis for a taxonomy of learning outcomes and a section on how educators can implement it in the classroom. The book integrates environmental ethics, zero growth and climate mitigation into a blueprint to educate successfully for a Great Transition to a truly sustainable future.
The purpose of this study about theological aspects of culture and social ethics is to investigate the relation between the theological tradition arising from Luther and the cultural immateriality which is culturally expressed in material progress and work. It is necessary to remember that it was Protestant theology itself that enabled this secularization process. Protestantism and modernity with its secularization proposal are processes that condition one another. Paul Tillich calls modernity and secularization the “Protestant Era” in the context of the Western culture of economic progress. It was mainly the theological tradition of the Enlightenment that separated the kingdom of the right from the kingdom of the left, law and gospel, creation and redemption, in such a way that the scope of creation became so autonomous that it dismissed the justification through the work of Christ, the gospel.
Thinking about Education in the Hebrew Tradition
The Lost Mirror traces cultural patterns in which the interpretation of learning and education was developed against the backdrop of Hebrew thought.

The appreciation of learning is deeply rooted in the Hebrew way of thinking. Learning is understood as an open and history-conscious engagement of man with culture. The consciousness of history is shaped by the motif of the unavailability of the “other” and the difference to this “other”. This “other” is traditionally remembered as “God”, but may also be reflected in the motifs of the other person or the other society. The Lost Mirror reminds us
of a deficit, which is that in our everyday thinking and everyday action, we usually hide, forget and partly suppress the meaning and presence of the unavailable other. The book approaches this thinking through portraits of people such as Janusz Korczak, Martin Buber, Hannah Arendt, Emmanuel Levinas, Jean-Francois Lyotard and others.
Virtue and Morality in the Chinese-German Dialogue
West-Eastern mirror discusses the formative cultural traditions in Germany/Europe and China with a special focus on the increasingly important aspects of “Virtue and morality”. At present, there are increasing difficulties in understanding the ‘other’ in their cultural framing. In view of the fact that economic or scientific exchange on an international level is a matter of necessity, in recent years the need to ensure the cultural prerequisites has become even more urgent. First, the title deals with the cultural influences in Europe (Judaism, Christianity, Enlightenment) and China (Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism). In the second part, the focus encompasses a dialogue of European philosophy, with Rousseau, Herbart, Gadamer and Hegel.