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Chapter 12 Localising STE2AM Education

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to present science education in ways that are meaningful and reflective of the interests of learners, their contexts and local needs. While there is emphasis on finding means to meeting the needs of the job market, there is a gap in identifying what learners need to know to compete in the global market and become proactive citizens. The chapter argues that a reform in education is required to address the 2030 sustainable development goals (SDGs) and types of jobs that are locally and globally related to addressing major local and global challenges. The chapter addresses this gap by expanding the current reference to STEM and STEAM education as an interdisciplinary perspective to a transdisciplinary one that includes the field of education for sustainable development (ESD). In doing so, the chapter highlights major global trends through the 2030 SDGs and major advancements in technology and how these can be integrated into a transdisciplinary STE 2 AM (double E) model. The focus of inquiry of this chapter, therefore, is to investigate a possible transdisciplinary model through a local lens in a country such as Egypt within a framework that meets local and global challenges and addresses the fourth industrial revolution.

In: STEM in Science Education and S in STEM
In: Designing and Teaching the Secondary Science Methods Course
In: Designing and Teaching the Secondary Science Methods Course
Introduction STEM in Science Education and S in STEM

Abstract

This introduction explains the main purpose of this book which is mainly to share knowledge and ideas about science education and STEM education. The book is intended to be an international book as it brings experiences and thoughts from around the globe. The authors of the chapters have brought to our attention topics related to issues found pressing in their own contexts. This book provides theoretical frameworks for researching and educating about science education and how it is positioned in the context of STEM education and vice versa. It came to the attention of the editors that a book is needed that provides a broad international perspective to implement STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) practices especially as despite the various funds for STEM education there has been slow progress ().

In: STEM in Science Education and S in STEM
Chapter 4 Promotion of STEM Education in Schools through Partnerships

Abstract

This chapter is based on the findings of a series of research studies that we carried out in this area “science teacher professional development and STEM education”. We begin with literature review on key issues related to STEM and the school culture, STEM as ‘interdisciplinary learning’, and Scientist-teacher partnerships (Section 1). Then we present the findings from two different studies to argue the need for a partnership between schools and the community to promote STEM education in school science. Study one, by focuses on exploring Saudi Arabian science teachers’ views regarding Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) pedagogy and its interdisciplinary nature. It also seeks to identify teachers’ views on the contextual factors that facilitate and hinder such pedagogy in their schools. Study two, by explores Egyptian science teachers’ views of scientists and scientific research, and to understand how they negotiated their views of scientists and scientific research in the classroom, and how these views informed their practices of using inquiry in the classroom. In Section 3, we discuss Challenges of STEM Integrations. This is followed by discussing Teachers’ call for a scientist-teacher partnership to promote Inquiry Based Learning (IBL). Then we present a discussion titled Towards Developing Integrated STEM Education in Schools (Section 4). The last part, concludes with the key findings and suggests future research (Section 5).

In: STEM in Science Education and S in STEM
Volume Editors: Nasser Mansour and Heba EL-Deghaidy
This book presents an international perspective of the influence of cultural issues on STEM reform. Effective STEM education is of considerable importance internationally because there is increase pressure by governments to produce technically skilled people from the compulsory education sectors; people capable of participating actively in the so-called’ knowledge economy’ or knowledge society. An important and distinguishing feature of the book is that it draws upon the empirical experiences and research of the local experts from an extremely diverse cohort across the world.

Contributors are: Nayif Awad, David Barlex, Alexandra Bazdar, Saouma BouJaoude, Heba EL-Deghaidy, Marwa Eltanahy, Sibel Erduran, Sufian Forawi, Clare Gartland, Lilia Halim, Ying-Shao Hsu, Zanaton Haji Iksan, Deena Khalil, Meredith Kier, Nasser Mansour, Mohamad Sattar Rasul, Seema Rivera, Dalene Swanson, Paige Teamey, Tuan Mastura Tuan Soh, Russell Tytler, Noël Williams and Yi-Fen Yeh.