Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Helena Pedersen x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author: Helena Pedersen

Melanie Joy, Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows: An Introduction to Carnism. San Francisco: Conari Press, 2010. 205 pp.

Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows is a welcome contribution to the debate on meat consumption—a debate, one must say, with an unclear status, situated as it is in the midst of a global animal industry that shows no signs of deteriorating but rather exhibits all the signs of violent expansion. The purpose of Melanie Joy’s book is to explain the psychological mind-set, a belief system she has termed “carnism,” behind consumer

Full Access
In: Society & Animals
Critical Animal Studies investigates and challenges the complex dynamics of structural, institutional and discursive power formations that affect animals, humans, and the environment. By “critical” we mean that animal studies must not become a safe and sanitized discourse; it must use its unique and powerful perspective to advance a radical and oppositional dissent that engages and politicizes the many profound ethical, environmental, and social issues embedded in animal studies. With a critical orientation to the study of human-animal relationships, the series seeks to contribute to current debates and be a resource for social justice, animal advocacy and environmental movements and research as well as for humanities and social science scholars more generally. The series bridges boundaries between academic and activist knowledge development, between scholarship and citizenship, between theory and praxis, as well as between existing disciplines. We particularly invite texts that explore under researched areas such as animals and climate change, globalization, capital, colonialism, queer theory, education theory, childhood studies, labor issues, and disability studies. We welcome contributions from any discipline. For more information on Critical Animal Studies, please visit: http://www.criticalanimalstudies.org.

Possible book proposals may:
• Intervene in the animal economy of the production, science, service, experience, and culture industries;
• Critically analyze ideologies, practices and effects of the current animal welfare movements;
• Explore diverse forms and sites of human and animal resistance;
• Reappraise preexisting texts (such as Elaine Scarry’s The Body in Pain) by exploring new connects to the field of critical animal studies;
• Contribute to bold, innovative, and boundary shifting knowledge development in critical animal studies.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
In: Meat Culture