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In: Annual Review of the Sociology of Religion
In: Annual Review of the Sociology of Religion

Abstract

By analysing the result of a survey conducted in 2018 in the most populated metropolis in Portugal, this study seeks to make a sociological characterisation of ‘believers without religion’ from a dual perspective: on one hand, their proximity to the non-believers groups regarding religious practices; on the other hand, their adjacency to Portuguese cultural Catholicism with respect to beliefs and attitudes. The growth of this population expresses a paradox: their identity accounts for the subsistence of fragments of a late traditional religiosity, but also points to the emergence of new forms of individual beliefs, strongly marked by the effects of the ‘subjective turn.’ In this context, the lack of institutional regulation does not convey an undetermined universe of believers. Paradoxically, references to cultural Catholicism endure; however, they do so hand in hand with forms of religious abandonment, giving rise to various paths that lead to a growing estrangement from Catholicism.

In: Journal of Religion in Europe

Abstract

By analysing the result of a survey conducted in 2018 in the most populated metropolis in Portugal, this study seeks to make a sociological characterisation of ‘believers without religion’ from a dual perspective: on one hand, their proximity to the non-believers groups regarding religious practices; on the other hand, their adjacency to Portuguese cultural Catholicism with respect to beliefs and attitudes. The growth of this population expresses a paradox: their identity accounts for the subsistence of fragments of a late traditional religiosity, but also points to the emergence of new forms of individual beliefs, strongly marked by the effects of the ‘subjective turn.’ In this context, the lack of institutional regulation does not convey an undetermined universe of believers. Paradoxically, references to cultural Catholicism endure; however, they do so hand in hand with forms of religious abandonment, giving rise to various paths that lead to a growing estrangement from Catholicism.

In: Journal of Religion in Europe

Abstract

Data from European countries allowed us to seek an explanation for different degrees of church commitment. The debate on church commitment has first and foremost contrasted secularization theory with the “new paradigm” of rational choice theory. This investigation focused on indicators related to secularization and rational choice theories, besides additional sociological variables—among others, the religious socialization in the formative years, and the impact of the Enlightenment. Following this investigation, the research focused on two related issues. The first is compartmentalization, the mental disjunction of religion from other aspects of life—for example family, economy and education, to wit, individuals’ subjective view of secularization. The theoretical question here was whether higher levels of church commitment are reflected in a low degree of compartmentalization. The second issue asked how people reacted to being confronted by an expanding diversity of religions, in other words, religious pluralism. The questions here were whether people with a high degree of church commitment had a positive or a negative attitude toward religious pluralism, both at a cultural and a private level.

In: Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 14