Search Results

Origin and History; Relief, Forest and Soil Development; Dynamics and Management
Authors: Josef Fanta and Henk Siepel
Man has had a complex relationship with inland drift sands through the ages. For some centuries these landscapes were seen as a threat, especially to agriculture and housing.
This book considers the processes, origin, conservation and restoration of this very special but harsh biotope, one that is characterised by fields of lichens with sparse grasses and heather alongside a range of special animal, fungi and plant species.
• Part 1 - Drift sand landscapes of NW Europe
• Part 2 - Microclimate and soil development
• Part 3 - Ecosystem succession on drift sands
• Part 4 - Forestation of drift sands
• Part 5 - Practical implications
In: Inland Drift Sand Landscapes
In: Inland Drift Sand Landscapes
In: Inland Drift Sand Landscapes
In: Economy and Ecology of Heathlands
In: Inland Drift Sand Landscapes
In: Economy and Ecology of Heathlands

Bats have a high species diversity and show unique ecological traits. The distribution patterns of European bat species differ between species. In this paper we seek to explain which life history traits, or interrelations between traits, can best explain observed differences in the distribution patterns of bats. Traits are interrelated and sometimes involve trade-offs, implying that a change in one trait may have positive or negative consequences for other traits. We describe the main morphological, physiological and ecological adaptations of insectivorous European bat species. We make pair-wise relations between traits, indicating the interrelations between traits, in terms of possible trade-offs. We relate the consequences of these trade-offs to the distribution maps of the species, focusing on the traits relevant for southern and northern distribution limits. We found coarse patterns that might indicate the distribution of related species are a consequence of their physiological, morphological and ecological adaptations and the interrelations between these adaptations. Hence, we think life-history strategies can be used to explain differences in species distribution. The method presented in this paper might also be useful for other mammal groups with a high species diversity, such as Rodentia and Soricidae.

In: Animal Biology
In: Economy and Ecology of Heathlands
In: Economy and Ecology of Heathlands