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In: Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law Online
In: International Institutional Law
In: International Institutional Law
In: International Institutional Law
In: International Institutional Law
In: International Institutional Law
In: International Institutional Law
Unity within Diversity, Fifth Revised Edition
For the e-version of the NEW 6th Edition of International Institutional Law, please go to: https://brill.com/view/title/36421
In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in the law of public international organizations. This fifth, revised edition of International Institutional Law covers the most recent developments in the field. Although public international organizations such as the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, the World Health Organization, ASEAN, the European Union and other organizations have broadly divergent objectives, powers, fields of activity and numbers of member states, they also share a wide variety of institutional problems.
Rather than being a handbook for specific organizations, the book offers a comparative analysis of the institutional law of international organizations. It includes comparative chapters on the rules and practices concerning membership, institutional structure, decision-making, financing, legal order, supervision and sanctions, legal status and external relations. The book’s theoretical framework and extensive use of case-studies is designed to appeal to both academics and practitioners.
See International Institutional paperback Edition
The proliferation of international organizations is presently a hot issue. New international organizations have been created over the last few years, such as the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons and the World Trade Organization. At the same time a certain reluctance may be observed to create new organizations. Overlapping activities and conflicting competences occur frequently and the need for coordination is evident. The events in former Yugoslavia are an example. Both during the armed conflicts in Bosnia and Kosovo and afterwards in the era of reconstruction, the need to coordinate the work of organizations such as the UN, NATO, the EU, the World Bank, OSCE, and the Council of Europe was vital.
Against this background a number of legal issues have become more important that have not yet been researched extensively, perhaps the only exception being the proliferation of international tribunals. Questions include the following: Why were new organizations created while others already existed in the same or a related field? What specific legal problems have arisen that are related to the coexistence of different organizations working (partly) in the same area? What mechanisms or instruments have been developed to coordinate the activities and to solve legal problems?
These and other questions were discussed during a conference that took place from 18 to 20 November, 1999, in the Academy Building of Leiden University, The Netherlands. A large number of experts, both academics and practitioners, participated. The purpose of this book is to present the issues discussed during the Leiden conference to a larger audience. This book contains the adapted papers for the conference and several other contributions.