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Henry Jansen

Classical theism, the dominant tradition in Christian theology, has stressed the metaphysical concept of God, i.e., God's ontological transcendence and independence from the world. In this century, however, this concept of God has increasingly met with criticism. On the basis of the Bible and new philosophical considerations, it is argued that a relational concept of God better answers the fundamental concerns of the Christian faith. In this book the author investigates the questions of whether one can conceive of God apart from the metaphysical attributes and whether reflection on the biblical depiction of God leads necessarily to a relational concept of God. The author explores the questions by examining the relational concepts of God found in two contemporary German theologians, Jürgen Moltmann and Wolfhart Pannenberg, and uses the divine attribute of immutability as a focus for the discussion. He argues that the relational concept of God presupposes another metaphysical conception of God, which raises problems as serious as those in classical theism, and that the Bible itself, because of its nature as a narrative text, is ambiguous in many respects as far as God is concerned. A truly Christian doctrine of God must take both the metaphysical and relational aspects of God into account.

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Henry Jansen

This essay begins by relating current interest in transcendence to the discussion on the similarities between religious language and poetic language. It then asks if the discussion need not go further, i.e. into an exploration of the spiritual values contained in the language of any written work. The first section compares the language of two “confessional” documents to draw attention to the different ways both religious texts work in terms of language in invoking a sense of transcendence. It then explores the possible contribution by F.R. Leavis, a twentieth-century literary critic, to resolving the problems this comparison raises, exploring his view of language and religion in the next section and analyzing two central themes in his thought: the technologico-Benthamite approach and dissociation of sensibility in the two subsequent sections. The essay then looks at the application of these concerns to the theme of transcendence.

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Edited by Jerald D. Gort, Henry Jansen and W. Stoker

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Edited by Jerald D. Gort, Henry Jansen and W. Stoker

Series:

Edited by Jerald D. Gort, Henry Jansen and W. Stoker

Series:

Edited by Jerald D. Gort, Henry Jansen and W. Stoker

Series:

Edited by Jerald D. Gort, Henry Jansen and W. Stoker

Christianity exists in relation to and interacts with its cultural environment in a number of ways. In this volume authors from a wide variety of backgrounds explore various facets of the relationship and interaction of Christianity with its cultural environment: politics, society, esthetics, religion and spirituality, and with itself. Divided into three main sections, Crossroad Discourses between Christianity and Culture looks at the interaction of Christianity with culture in the first section, with other religions and spiritualities in the second, and finally with itself in the third. The contributions engage in a critical examination of not only the culture in which Christianity finds itself but also in a critical examination of Christianity itself and its interaction with that culture.
The editors hope that teachers, students, and readers in general will profit greatly from the critical articles contained in this book.

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Edited by Jerald D. Gort, Henry Jansen and Hendrik M. Vroom