Proximity to Power and Jewish Sectarian Groups of the Ancient Period

A Review of Lifestyle, Values, and Halakha in the Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, and Qumran

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Hillel Newman

This book deals with the values, lifestyle and code of law of four Jewish sectarian groups in the Hellenistic and Roman (Second Temple) period, in the land of Israel. It reviews the groups according to their proximity to power, highlighting the fact that political involvement has a decisive impact on the life and development of these social groups. The groups under review, the Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes and Qumran, receive a new historical description, from the viewpoint of their proximity to power.
The issue of what determines the course of a social group, whether normative or sectarian, is discussed, and the traditional terminology is re-examined. Original terminology is established. The first part of the book deals with the question of terminology, the available sources and the presentation of the different groups.

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Edited by Menahem Kister, Hillel I. Newman, Michael Segal and Ruth A. Clements

Tradition, Transmission, and Transformation from Second Temple Literature through Judaism and Christianity in Late Antiquity

Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Symposium of the Orion Center for the Study of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Associated Literature, Jointly Sponsored by the Hebrew University Center for the Study of Christianity, 22–24 February, 2011

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Edited by Menahem Kister, Hillel Newman, Michael Segal and Ruth Clements

Many types of tradition and interpretation found in later Jewish and Christian writings trace their origins to the Second Temple period, but their transmission and transformation followed different paths within the two religious communities. For example, while Christians often translated and transmitted discrete Second Temple texts, rabbinic Judaism generally preserved earlier traditions integrated into new literary frameworks. In both cases, ancient traditions were often transformed to serve new purposes but continued to bear witness to their ancient roots. Later compositions may even provide the key to clarifying obscurities in earlier texts. The contributions in this volume explore the dynamics by which earlier texts and traditions were transmitted and transformed in these later bodies of literature and their attendant cultural contexts.

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Edited by Menahem Kister, Hillel I. Newman, Michael Segal and Ruth A. Clements

Series:

Edited by Menahem Kister, Hillel I. Newman, Michael Segal and Ruth A. Clements