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Author: Hilmar Pabel
The first monograph in English on Erasmus of Rotterdam as an editor of St. Jerome, this book belongs to the growing scholarship on the reception of the Church Fathers in early modern Europe. Erasmus, like other Renaissance humanists, particularly admired Jerome (d. 419 or 420), and he expressed his admiration most conspicuously in his edition of Jerome’s letters. Proclaiming his editorial Herculean labours, Erasmus energetically promoted himself and his publication. Erasmus’ self-promotion cannot be reduced to a secular appropriation of Jerome, however. A detailed examination of a variety of editorial interventions demonstrates Erasmus’ religious purpose, his debt to previous editorial traditions as well as his editorial novelty, and his influence on subsequent sixteenth-century editions of Jerome.
In: Jesuit Image Theory
Author: Hilmar Pabel

Abstract

Willem Vorsterman was a leading printer in Antwerp in the first half of the sixteenth century. He printed two anthologies of the letters of St. Jerome, one in 1515, the other in 1533. These deserve attention in connection with Erasmus of Rotterdam, the renowned humanist champion and editor of Jerome. In its preface, the first anthology takes up the cause of humanist theology and invokes Erasmus' authority on the eve of his celebrated edition of Jerome. His name adds value to the anthology. The second anthology does not refer to Erasmus at all; nevertheless it yields traces of his editorial influence.

In: Quaerendo
Author: Hilmar Pabel

Abstract

Peter Canisius, one of the most dynamic Jesuits of the second half of the sixteenth century, explicitly identified Augustine's Confessions as his exemplar when composing his Testament, an autobiographical work, at the end of his life. This article explores the ways in which the Confessions might have influenced Canisius's self-representation first by establishing the Jesuit's familiarity with the text and then by considering his modes of appropriating it. The Testament and an earlier autobiographical text are the principal sources for analysis. A self-accusatory tone and especially a confessionalized construction of Canisius's life that emphasizes his resolute adherence to Catholicism constitute the most prominent features of his reception of the Confessions.

In: Church History and Religious Culture
Author: Hilmar M. Pabel

The publication in 1516 of Erasmus of Rotterdam’s New Testament and his edition of St. Jerome invites an exploration of his concept and deployment of this Church Father’s exegetical authority. A thorough analysis of Erasmus’s Annotations on the New Testament shows that he appealed to Jerome among other Fathers and on his own. Jerome figures primarily in the main business of the Annotations: the establishment of a correct Latin translation of the text of the New Testament. His role in the theological dimension of exegesis is secondary. Erasmus’s use of Jerome as authoritative support for his exegetical judgments as well as his criticisms of Jerome have the effect of asserting his credentials as an authoritative exegete.

In: Church History and Religious Culture