African American Agency, West African Intellectuals and the International Trade Union Committee of Negro Workers
Author: Holger Weiss
In Framing a Radical African Atlantic Holger Weiss presents a critical outline and analysis of the International Trade Union Committee of Negro Workers (ITUCNW) and the attempts by the Communist International (Comintern) to establish an anticolonial political platform in the Caribbean and Sub-Saharan Africa during the interwar period. It is the first presentation about the organization and its activities, investigating the background and objectives, the establishment and expansion of a radical African (black) Atlantic network between 1930 and 1933, the crisis in 1933 when the organization was relocated from Hamburg to Paris, the attempt to reactivate the network in 1934 and 1935 and its final dissolution and liquidation in 1937-38.
Nordic Possessions in the Atlantic World during the Era of the Slave Trade
Editor: Holger Weiss
This anthology addresses and analyses the transformation of interconnected spaces and spatial entanglements in the Atlantic rim during the era of the slave trade by focusing on the Danish possessions on the Gold Coast and their Caribbean islands of Saint Thomas, Saint Jan and Saint Croix as well as on the Swedish Caribbean island of Saint Barthélemy. The first part of the anthology addresses aspects of interconnectedness in West Africa, in particular the relationship between Africans and Danes on the Gold Coast. The second part of this volume examines various aspects of interconnectedness, creolisation and experiences of Danish and Swedish slave rules in the Caribbean.
Editor: Holger Weiss
This book provides an analysis of the articulation and organisation of radical international solidarity by organisations that were either connected to or had been established by the Communist International (Comintern), such as the International Red Aid, the International Workers’ Relief, the League Against Imperialism, the International of Seamen and Harbour Workers and the International Trade Union Committee of Negro Workers. The guiding light of these organisations was a radical interpretation of international solidarity, usually in combination with concepts and visions of gender, race and class as well as anti-capitalism, anti-imperialism, anti-colonialism and anti-fascism. All of these new transnational networks form a controversial part of the contemporary history of international organisations. Like the Comintern these international organisations had an ambigious character that does not fit nicely into the traditional typologies of international organisations as they were neither international governmental organisations nor international non-governmental organisations. They constituted a radical continuation of the pre-First World War Left and exemplified an attempt to implement the ideas and movements of a new type of radical international solidarity not only in Europe, but on a global scale.

Contributors are: Gleb J. Albert, Bernhard H. Bayerlein, Kasper Braskén, Fredrik Petersson, Holger Weiss.
Author: Holger Weiss

Abstract

During the second half of the twentieth century the contribution of Muslim NGOs in providing basic social welfare became a significant feature in Ghana. However, none of the Muslim NGOs are able to finance their projects themselves but rely on foreign financial assistance. On the other hand, Ghanaian Muslim scholars have argued for the need to develop zakāt, the locally collected obligatory alms, into a fully-fledged welfare system. At the moment, this is not the case. On the other hand, there exists a local tradition of mutual support and tributary relations in Ghana, which is at least by some Muslims identified as being as efficient in providing social welfare. This article discusses the link between communal support and the provision of social welfare through Muslim NGOs and especially zak t in today's Northern Ghana.

In: Journal of Religion in Africa
In: International Communism and Transnational Solidarity: Radical Networks, Mass Movements and Global Politics, 1919–1939
In: International Communism and Transnational Solidarity: Radical Networks, Mass Movements and Global Politics, 1919–1939
In: Ports of Globalisation, Places of Creolisation