The area along the Lawa River, the border river between Surinam and French Guiana, is presently inhabited by about 2,000 Maroons who call themselves Aluku or Boni. They are the descendants of Surinamese slaves who escaped from plantations during the period of slavery. After protracted fighting on Surinamese territory, they finally fled to French Guiana.
This is a fascinating account of the genesis of the Boni- Maroons and their continuous warfare against the white planters and their colonial armies. The works that have been published on the Boni-Maroons, for instance John Gabriel Stedman's famous 'Narrative' from 1796, represent only fragments of the Boni-history.
Wim Hoogbergen's book is a successful attempt to paint an overall picture of this interesting Maroon-history. The author combed the archives of The Netherlands, France and Surinam in search of data referring to the Boni-Maroons from their origins until 1860, with astonishing results.

Systematic outline of present information on Aluku, an important headman in the second war between the Boni-Maroons and the Dutch. The author uses the 1961 account of the Moravian brother Axwijk as a starting point. Then he introduces other secondary sources on the oral tradition of the Maroons as well as archival records to describe Aluku's life.

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids

Narrative history of the Kwinti Maroons covering approximately 250 years. They had settled West of Paramaribo before 1750. Only in 1887, 24 years after the abolition of slavery, did the authorities acknowledge the Kwinti as free Maroons. Based on archival sources in Suriname and the Netherlands.

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids
In: Geweld in de West
In: Een zwarte vrijstaat in Suriname
In: Een zwarte vrijstaat in Suriname
In: Een zwarte vrijstaat in Suriname
In: Een zwarte vrijstaat in Suriname
In: Een zwarte vrijstaat in Suriname
In: Een zwarte vrijstaat in Suriname