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In: Journal of Jesuit Studies
In: A Companion to Multiconfessionalism in the Early Modern World
A Companion to the Reformation in Central Europe analyses the diverse Christian cultures of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the Czech lands, Austria, and lands of the Hungarian kingdom between the 15th and 18th centuries. It establishes the geography of Reformation movements across this region, and then considers different movements of reform and the role played by Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox clergy. This volume examines different contexts and social settings for reform movements, and investigates how cities, princely courts, universities, schools, books, and images helped spread ideas about reform. This volume brings together expertise on diverse lands and churches to provide the first integrated account of religious life in Central Europe during the early modern period.

Contributors are: Phillip Haberkern, Maciej Ptaszyński, Astrid von Schlachta, Márta Fata, Natalia Nowakowska, Luka Ilić, Michael Springer, Edit Szegedi, Mihály Balázs, Rona Johnston Gordon, Howard Louthan, Tadhg Ó hAnnracháin, Liudmyla Sharipova, Alexander Schunka, Rudolf Schlögl, Václav Bůžek, Mark Hengerer, Michael Tworek, Pál Ács, Maria Crăciun, Grażyna Jurkowlaniec, Laura Lisy-Wagner, and Graeme Murdock.
In: A Companion to the Reformation in Central Europe
In: A Companion to the Reformation in Central Europe
In: A Companion to the Reformation in Central Europe
In: A Companion to the Reformation in Central Europe
In: A Companion to the Reformation in Central Europe
Print Culture at the Crossroads investigates how the spread of printing shaped a distinctive literary culture in Central Europe during the early modern period. Moving beyond the boundaries of the nation state, twenty-five scholars from over a dozen countries examine the role of the press in a region characterised by its many cultures, languages, religions, and alphabets. Antitrinitarians, Roman and Greek Catholics, Calvinists, Jews, Lutherans, and Orthodox Christians used the press to preserve and support their communities. By examining printing and patronage networks, catalogues, inventories, woodblocks, bindings, and ownership marks, this volume reveals a complicated web of connections linking printers and scholars, Jews and Christians, across Central Europe and beyond.