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As an Indo-European language, Armenian has been the subject of etymological research for over a hundred years. There are many valuable systematic handbooks, studies and surveys on comparative Armenian linguistics. Almost all of these works, with a few exceptions, mostly concentrate on Classical Armenian and touch the dialects only sporadically. Non-literary data taken from Armenian dialects have largely remained outside of the scope of Indo-European etymological considerations. This book provides an up-to-date description of the Indo-European lexical stock of Armenian with systematic inclusion of dialectal data. It incorporates the lexical, phonetic, and morphological material in the Armenian dialects into the etymological treatment of the Indo-European lexicon. In this respect it is completely new.

The Armenian word čandar-i appears in two basic meanings: ‘plane tree’ and ‘poplar, aspen’. It is attested in a Commentary on Genesis hesitantly attributed to Eɫišē. The other two attestations of the word come from authors originating from eastern parts of Armenia: Kirakos Ganjakec‘i (13th century) and Zak‘aria Sarkawag K‘anak‘eṙc‘i (17th century). Particularly important is the testimony from Chapter 21 of Ganjakec‘i who mentions čandari, the local equivalent of sawsi ‘plane tree’. The Iranian origin of čandar-i is obvious, though the etymological details are unclear. Łarabaɫ tənǰərí/ɛ́, which refers to both ‘plane tree’ and ‘poplar’ and is found in a late mediaeval Armenian dictionary, Baṙgirk‘ hayoc‘, derives from čandari through metathesis: čandari > *čəndərí > tənǰərí/ɛ́. The combined evidence from Ganjakec‘i, Baṙgirk‘ hayoc‘ and the Łarabaɫ dialect testifies to the existence and unbroken development of the word in the territory of Łarabaɫ and surroundings and shows that the metathesis (čandari > tənǰərí/ɛ́) took place at some stage between the 13th and 16-17th centuries.

In: Iran and the Caucasus

This paper aims to present seven Armenian personal names of Iranian origin from the Armenian historical provinces of Siwnik‘ and Arc‘ax: Dadi/Dadoy, Kohazat, Marhan, Mrhapet, Niw-dast, Niw-Xosrov, and *Oyz/Uz. These names are scantily attested in literature (almost all of them being hapaxes) and are, therefore, little known to scholarship.

In: Iran and the Caucasus