Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for

  • Author or Editor: Ian Barnett x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Translator: Ian Barnett
In Co-operative Struggles, Denise Kasparian expands the theoretical horizons regarding labour unrest by proposing new categories to make visible and conceptualize conflicts in the new worker co-operativism of the twenty-first century.

After the depletion of neoliberal reforms at the dawn of the twenty-first century in Argentina, co-operativism gained momentum, mainly due to the recuperation of enterprises by their workers and state promotion of co-operatives through social policies. These new co-operatives became actors not just in production but in social struggle. Their peculiarity lies in the fact that they shape a socio-productive form not structured on wage relations: workers are at the same time members of the organisations. Why, how and by what cleavages and groupings do these co-operative workers without bosses come into conflict?
In: Co-operative Struggles: Work Conflicts in Argentina’s New Worker Co-operatives
In: Co-operative Struggles: Work Conflicts in Argentina’s New Worker Co-operatives
In: Co-operative Struggles: Work Conflicts in Argentina’s New Worker Co-operatives
In: Co-operative Struggles: Work Conflicts in Argentina’s New Worker Co-operatives
In: Co-operative Struggles: Work Conflicts in Argentina’s New Worker Co-operatives
In: Co-operative Struggles: Work Conflicts in Argentina’s New Worker Co-operatives
In: Co-operative Struggles: Work Conflicts in Argentina’s New Worker Co-operatives
In: Co-operative Struggles: Work Conflicts in Argentina’s New Worker Co-operatives

Abstract

We assessed how self-motion affects the visual representation of the self. We constructed a novel virtual-reality experiment that systematically varied an avatar’s motion and also biological sex. Participants were presented with pairs of avatars that visually represented the participant (‘self-avatar’), or another person (‘opposite avatar’). Avatar motion either corresponded with the participant’s motion, or was decoupled from the participant’s motion. The results show that participants identified with (i) ‘self-avatars’ over ‘opposite-avatars’, (ii) avatars moving congruently with self-motion over incongruent motion, and importantly (iii) with the ‘opposite avatar’ over the ‘self-avatar’ when the opposite avatar’s motion was congruent with self-motion. Our results suggest that both self-motion and biological sex are relevant to the body schema and body image and that congruent bottom-up visual feedback of self-motion is particularly important for the sense of self and capable of overriding top-down self-identification factors such as biological sex.

In: Multisensory Research