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Jung was not particularly strongly connected with the perspective of social thought, although the main categories of his conception undoubtedly often have the adjective “collective”; they are categories of unconscious and the archetype considered as a structure of a collective nature: for example, as “categories of collective imagination”. In this term, he referred to the philosophical history of the conceptions of the unconscious as a sphere conditioning all the significant processes of reality and the sociological approaches of the French school of “collective representations,” which influenced his notion of the archetype. There are many dilemmas about the relationship that can occur between a differentiation of collective and social levels. A lot of Jung’s writings refer directly to the issues of social thought, especially, but not only, those concentrated in the volume Civilization in Transition, for example, statements from his interviews, notes from meetings with him (they present extensive material of Jung’s comments to current situations and events of a socio-political nature, such as totalitarianism, authoritarianism, political leadership) or the issue of contemporary forms of religiosity. Many of these writings present a special relationship between the individual and society, the archetype and the historical, social dimensions, mass processes and collective imagination, in which archetypal images operate. Jung is not the only researcher who has demonstrated a deep understanding of the problem of collective/social imagination. Similar grasps can be found, among others, in the conceptions of Gilbert Durand or Charles Taylor. The first examines the anthropological structures of these images, the second, changes in social imaginaries and their characteristics. The juxtaposition of these forms of reflection opens the way to understanding a particular power of collective imagination.

In: Collective Structures of Imagination in Jungian Interpretation
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It seems to be a paradox that Jung defined an archetype as a collective pattern however social history was not a subject of his interest and social thought was not a path of his conception. The Undiscovered Self and texts from Civilization in Transition or some his notices in interviews have undeniable social character; many statements from the studies on religious symbolism, alchemy or on literature contain also clear social dimension. His defense of individual status in contemporary mass societies, attack on non-authentic, alienated, conventional forms of life experiences and existence, on slave-state and logic of great number are very characteristic and they take their own place in the stream of psychoanalytical, neo-psychoanalytical path of social thought corresponding with Frankfurt School reinterpretation Freud’s understanding of individual-society relation.

Jung was a critique of mass society and his position in confrontation with social dilemmas was very critical. A negative image of European experiences is based on colonialism, conquests, “blood baths” of conflicts, wars and the violence of missionary activity of the Church. The contemporary society – due to the history of our culture and direction of social development – is largely penetrated by negative forms of mass processes, gradual erosion of individuals and communities.

In: Contemporary Influences of C. G. Jung's Thought
The book is a volume of the collected works of sixteen different authors. They reflect the contemporary meaning of C. G. Jung’s theory on many fields of scientific activity and in a different cultural context: Japanese, South American and North American, as well as European: English, Italian and Polish. The authors consider a specific milieu of Jung’s theory and his influence or possible dialogue with contemporary ideas and scientific activity. A major task of the book will be to outline the contemporary—direct or indirect—usefulness and applicability of Jung's ideas at the beginning of the twenty-first century while simultaneously making a critical review of this theory.
In: Collective Structures of Imagination in Jungian Interpretation
In: Contemporary Influences of C. G. Jung's Thought
This book presents an analysis of the social aspects of Carl Gustav Jung's thought and its followers, the interpretation of the phenomena of contemporary social life (social imagery) from the perspective of the main categories of this thought (archetype, unconscious, collectivity, mass society, mass man). It also contains an attempt of their application for understanding contemporary social and political phenomena (e.g. Brazilian sebastianism, Balkan conflicts, virtual-imagery sphere of communication, figures of imagery in popular culture, and others). The authors examine the relationship between Jung’s and Jungians' (E. Neumann, J. Hillman, J. L. Henderson) conceptions and many accompanying them (e.g. Frankfurt school, Bachelard’s philosophy, American cultural psychoanalysis) and the background of contemporary social psychology, sociology, and cultural anthropology.