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  • Author or Editor: Ineta Ziemele x
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Research on tradition can be approached from various perspectives. It can be a study of key personalities or important scholarly works, or influential positions or documents adopted by the State within the international normative process. Concepts such as statehood, territorial integrity, equal participation in international decision- making and, recently, the rule of law in international law, have been of relevance and interest both in practice and academic research in the field of international law in Latvia. The proposition is put forward that research in international law by the scholars of a particular State is closely linked to the interests and issues which that State is confronted with in practice.

In: Baltic Yearbook of International Law Online
Editor:
Celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Baltic Yearbook of International Law, this volume contains a selection of articles chosen by the editors to showcase the Yearbook’s important contribution to international legal scholarship and practice. It thus offers ground-breaking articles within several areas of international law, including international humanitarian law, international human rights law, peaceful settlement of disputes, European Union law, and the history of international law. Naturally, issues relevant to the international legal status of the Baltic States and the consequences of their occupation by the Soviet Union are also explored, as well as questions relevant to transitional justice and the collapse of communism. Finally, articles on new areas, such as bioethics and cyberspace, are also included, showing where the development of science prompts the need for legal regulation. This wide-ranging selection reflects the Yearbook’s aim to offer a unique forum among international legal periodicals - where the past meets the future.
Editor:
There has always been some discomfort about reservations in relation to international obligations of States applicable to individuals. This apprehension was once again brought to the forefront of the international normative process with General Comment No. 24 of the Human Rights Committee and the work of the International Law Commission on reservations to treaties.
This book is a contribution to the debate on reservations to human rights treaties. Several key questions are addressed. Can the reservations' regime, as codified in the 1969 Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, adequately address human rights relationships? Is there a danger of further fragmentation of international law if human rights treaties were to be treated differently as concerns the reservations'regime applicable to these treaties? Should the distinction be made between the validity of a reservation and the effects of a reservation found to be invalid? These and other questions continue to generate a variety of answers.
In: State Continuity and Nationality: The Baltic States and Russia
In: State Continuity and Nationality: The Baltic States and Russia
In: State Continuity and Nationality: The Baltic States and Russia
In: State Continuity and Nationality: The Baltic States and Russia
In: State Continuity and Nationality: The Baltic States and Russia
In: State Continuity and Nationality: The Baltic States and Russia