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  • Author or Editor: Iosif J Zhakevich x
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While Gen. 19.33–35 in the Hebrew Bible indicates that Lot did not know that his daughters lay with him, the manuscript of TgPsJ suggests that Lot did know when the older daughter arose after the act of intercourse was completed. The printed editions of TgPsJ disagree with the manuscript, but agree with the Hebrew Bible and state that Lot did not know when either daughter lay down or arose. This raises the question: Is the manuscript accurate or does it contain a textual error? Scholars disagree. Some affirm the manuscript; others prefer the printed editions. This article argues that the text of the manuscript is accurate: the targumist did indeed state that Lot knew when his older daughter arose after she lay with him.

In: Aramaic Studies
In: A Targumist Interprets the Torah: Contradictions and Coherence in Targum Pseudo-Jonathan
In: A Targumist Interprets the Torah: Contradictions and Coherence in Targum Pseudo-Jonathan
In: A Targumist Interprets the Torah: Contradictions and Coherence in Targum Pseudo-Jonathan
In: A Targumist Interprets the Torah: Contradictions and Coherence in Targum Pseudo-Jonathan
In: A Targumist Interprets the Torah: Contradictions and Coherence in Targum Pseudo-Jonathan
In: A Targumist Interprets the Torah: Contradictions and Coherence in Targum Pseudo-Jonathan
This book conducts a focused study of contradictions and coherence in Targum Pseudo-Jonathan. The first section of this study examines the apparent disruption of congruity with regard to the vertical dimension of the Targum, that is, between the Torah (the Hebrew Vorlage) and the Targum (the Aramaic translation). The second section addresses the apparent disruption of congruity with regard to the horizontal dimension of the Targum, that is, within the boundaries of the TgPsJ corpus. Ultimately, this work suggests that the contradictions are given to resolution, once the greater context of biblical and Jewish tradition is taken into consideration.

Abstract

While the Hebrew Bible does not specify the duration of Rebekah’s barrenness, Targum Pseudo-Jonathan (TgPsJ) Gen. 25:21 introduces a comment that Rebekah was barren for twenty-two years. This appears to produce an inconsistency, both between the Hebrew Bible and TgPsJ, and within the TgPsJ narrative itself. Two references to Isaac’s age—in the context of his relationship to Rebekah—seem to suggest that Rebekah was barren for twenty years: At 25:20, Isaac marries Rebekah when he is forty; and at 25:26, Esau and Jacob are born when Isaac is sixty. This twenty-year gap presumably reveals the twenty years of Rebekah’s barrenness. Indeed, scholars have suggested that TgPsJ’s ‘twenty-two years’ be emended to ‘twenty years’. This article, however, contends that TgPsJ’s ‘twenty-two years’ should be retained, and that the text of TgPsJ proves to be a coherent text when read in the greater context of biblical and Jewish tradition about Isaac and Rebekah.

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In: Aramaic Studies