Search Results

Abstract

Chorus counts are widely used to assess population abundance in breeding anurans. It is however unclear how such counts translate into true population sizes. We monitored chorus activity in two populations of the European tree frog (Hyla arborea) over three years, while simultaneously conducting a capture-mark-recapture (CMR) study on breeding males. Three to four capture sessions were made each year, spread across the acme of the breeding season. Individual recognition was ensured by photographs of the linea marginalis. We used Pollock's robust design to test several biological hypotheses and estimate demographic parameters. Male survival was estimated as mean ±SE = 0.297 ± 0.154. Population trends deduced from chorus counts (maximum or mean) and modelled male population sizes were not concordant. We showed that there is no simple relationship between maximum or mean chorus size and modelled male population sizes estimated from CMR study and that population trends inferred from chorus counts are likely to be biased to an unknown extent. Even though CMR methods need significant time and personnel investments in order to produce reliable results, we advocate their use in the study of pond breeding amphibians' demography, as it provides unbiased and more precise estimates.

In: Amphibia-Reptilia

Abstract

Designing cost-effective monitoring protocols is a fundamental prerequisite for amphibian conservation. Here, we report a comparison of flashlight survey and trapping (with and without light sticks as trap baits) in order to determine flashlight detectability and trap detectability of great crested newts (Triturus cristatus). Twelve ponds were surveyed in Switzerland where T. cristatus had been known to occur. We measured covariates affecting both flashlight detectability and trap detectability. Newt flashlight detectability using 20 min long flashlight surveys was on average ± SE = 39% ± 10%). Flashlight detectability was mostly influenced by surface and submerged vegetation density, as well as by water temperature. Newt trap detectability during one night using six funnel traps per pond was on average±SE = 41%±10%. Trap detectability was mainly affected by trap position in the pond, with traps lying on the pond floor being more likely to attract newts. The use of light sticks did not enhance the trap detectability. Estimates of flashlight detectability and trap detectability were used to define how many times the sites have to be visited to be 95% certain of not missing T. cristatus in ponds where they are present. In both cases multiple visits (7 flashlight surveys or 6 trapping sessions) have to be performed. Flashlight surveys are the most easily applied and most cost-effective method to use in large scale programs.

In: Amphibia-Reptilia

Abstract

The survival of threatened species as the European tree frog (Hyla arborea) is strongly dependent on the genetic variability within populations, as well as gene flow between them. In Switzerland, only two sectors in its western part still harbour metapopulations. The first is characterised by a very heterogeneous and urbanized landscape, while the second is characterised by a uninterrupted array of suitable habitats. In this study, six microsatellite loci were used to establish levels of genetic differentiation among the populations from the two different locations. The results show that the metapopulations have: (i) weak levels of genetic differentiation (FST within metapopulation ≈ 0.04), (ii) no difference in levels of genetic structuring between them, (iii) significant (p = 0.019) differences in terms of genetic diversity (Hs) and observed heterozygozity (Ho), the metapopulation located in a disturbed landscape showing lower values. Our results suggest that even if the dispersal of H. arborea among contiguous ponds seems to be efficient in areas of heterogeneous landscape, a loss of genetic diversity can occur.

In: Amphibia-Reptilia

Abstract

Individual members of a population of 'prolonged' breeding amphibian species are asynchronously present at their breeding sites. Therefore, population size estimates can be misleading when based on commonly used closed or open-population capture-mark-recapture approaches. The superpopulation approach, a modified Jolly-Seber model, has been successfully applied in taxa other than amphibians with distinct migratory behaviour and where individuals are asynchronously present at the sampling site. In this paper, we suggest that the superpopulation approach is a useful population size estimator for 'prolonged' breeding amphibian species. Two case studies on European anurans show that superpopulation estimates are much higher than simple population counts. A simulation study showed that superpopulation estimates are unbiased but that accuracy can be low when either survival or detection probabilities (or both) are low. We recommend the superpopulation approach because it matches the natural history and phenology of amphibian species with prolonged breeding seasons.

In: Amphibia-Reptilia