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Annotated Legal Documents on Islam in Europe Online consists of an annotated collection of legal documents affecting the status of Islam and Muslims in Europe. By legal documents are meant the texts of legislation, including relevant secondary legislation, as well as significant court decisions. Each legal text is preceded by an introduction describing the historical, political and legal circumstances of its adoption, plus a short paragraph summarising its content. The legal texts are published in the original language while the annotations and supporting material will be in English. The focus of the collection is on the religious dimensions of being Muslim in Europe, i.e. on individuals' access to practise their religious obligations and on the ability to organise and manifest their religious life. The project will cover the 28 member states of the European Union (including Croatia), Norway and Switzerland plus the European Union and the European Court of Justice.

Features and Benefits
- Cross country search functionality
- Filter facet by country
- Full text searchable
- Complete volume set (32 fascicles) available by 2021
- Legal documents are published in their original language with English annotations

Abstract

Prior to the arrival of Muslim immigrants and refugees into Denmark in the 1970s and after, Denmark’s experience with Islam was partly through university-based research and partly through missionary activities. During the 1980s and 1990s both sectors gradually adapted to the settlement of Muslims in the country. In the 1990s the public political debate became increasingly heated, leading to a steady tightening of immigration and refugee policies. In this debate an Islamic dimension was starkly exacerbated by the events of 11 September 2001 and the arrival of a new centre-right government two months later. This was the environment in which the ‘Muhammad cartoons’ were published in September 2005, and in which the domestic and international crisis played out over the subsequent 6-8 months. But the events also encouraged the emergence of new Islamic organizations and new responses, both negative and positive, on the part of the churches. While the sharp public debate continues, new apparently sustainable structures of Christian-Muslim relations have appeared.

In: Exchange
In: Religion im öffentlichen Raum