Author: J. H. Wearden

The main body of the text presents an English translation of the article by on body temperature and time judgements. In summary, François used diathermy, the passage of high-frequency electric current through the body, to change body temperature in three young female participants. Two timing tasks: tapping at a rate that was usually 3/s, and adjusting a variable-speed metronome to a rate judged to be 4/s were used. In general, increases in body temperature shortened the intervals produced, but lengthened duration estimates. The author also discusses (a) the potential use of diurnal variation in body temperature, (b) the use of pulse rate as a predictor of time judgements, and (c) the use of febrile patients. The translation is followed by a short commentary focussing on later studies of body temperature and time judgements, and studies of aspects of heart rate and time judgements.

In: Timing & Time Perception
Author: J. H. Wearden

Three participants produced a large number of verbal estimates of tone durations in the range of 77–1183 ms. Data from this task were simulated by an ‘attractor model’, which used the idea of competition between ‘attractors’ (‘quantized’ values output as verbal estimates) which differed in weight, and distance from the stimulus duration to be estimated. To produce an estimate, all attractors competed for priority as output values, with the final value being decided probabilistically. The model embodied underlying scalar representations of time, in the form of mean accuracy and constant coefficient of variation. The model was able to reconcile such scalar properties of time with deviations from scalar properties often found in verbal estimation data, such as declining coefficients of variation with increasing duration value. The model furthermore showed that multiplicative and additive changes in underlying time representations should be translated veridically into behaviour, although the attractor competition process could distort patterns and absolute values of underlying variance.

In: Timing & Time Perception