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  • Author or Editor: J. Kwabena Asamoah-Gyadu x
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This paper discusses some of the innovative religious responses to evil in Ghanaian life. It focuses on how indigenous Christianity, often inspired by Pentecostal/Charismatic piety, has appropriated African traditional religious worldviews of so called mystical causality in the search for answers to the mysteries of life. This paper relates two real incidents from the traditional religious and Christian contexts in Ghana to illustrate how Africans generally interpret and then search for solutions to misfortunes in the religious and theological realms of life. It further describes how Ghanaian Christians, in desperate searches for ayaresa ne ogyee, “healing and deliverance,” visit various prayer places looking for God’s intervention and the various symbols, icons, and rhetoric associated with those processes. The role of the religious functionary—traditional priest, Muslim cleric, or Christian prophet and pastor—as one with the ability to “see” into the supernatural realm and use its resources for the benefit of those in search of salvation is critical to this discussion.

In: Coping with Evil in Religion and Culture

This paper discusses some of the innovative religious responses to evil in Ghanaian life. It focuses on how indigenous Christianity, often inspired by Pentecostal/Charismatic piety, has appropriated African traditional religious worldviews of so called mystical causality in the search for answers to the mysteries of life. This paper relates two real incidents from the traditional religious and Christian contexts in Ghana to illustrate how Africans generally interpret and then search for solutions to misfortunes in the religious and theological realms of life. It further describes how Ghanaian Christians, in desperate searches for ayaresa ne ogyee, “healing and deliverance,” visit various prayer places looking for God’s intervention and the various symbols, icons, and rhetoric associated with those processes. The role of the religious functionary—traditional priest, Muslim cleric, or Christian prophet and pastor—as one with the ability to “see” into the supernatural realm and use its resources for the benefit of those in search of salvation is critical to this discussion.

In: Coping with Evil in Religion and Culture
In: African Charismatics
In: African Charismatics
In: African Charismatics
In: African Charismatics