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Author: Jacqueline Grey

This review explores two chapters of The Prophetic Imagination by Walter Brueggemann in celebration of the 35th anniversary of its publication. It provides a brief summary of the third and fourth chapters, and then discusses the application of those chapters within the context of Pentecostal communities, particularly from the perspective of Australian Pentecostalism and women. An application from the Australian context is to avoid abuses of power by heeding the voice of the marginalized within our organizational structures. In contrast, an application from the perspective of Pentecostal women highlights the engendered nature of Brueggemann’s model. If the prophet (according to Brueggemann) is to weep for the death of royal consciousness, the challenge for women is that their weeping is too easily misunderstood or misinterpreted as ‘emotional’ or ‘hormonal’. Instead, an alternative approach is suggested that draws from the heritage of women prophets, that is, to not weep but to sing.

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology

This review and the three that follow were originally presented as a panel discussion of John Goldingay’s The Theology of the Book of Isaiah presented at the Society for Pentecostal Studies Biblical Studies section at the 2015 Society for Biblical Literature meeting. This review first presents an overview of the structure of Goldingay’s monograph before exploring and critiquing its content. There are three main issues highlighted in this analysis of Goldingay’s book: 1. the question of the starting point for the development of a biblical theology of Isaiah; 2. the need for ethical reflection and application of the theologies of Isaiah that are developed in Goldingay’s book; and 3. how the theology of revelation explored in Goldingay’s book may contribute to a Pentecostal understanding of prophecy.

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology

This essay provides a critical review of Craig Keener’s Spirit Hermeneutics: Reading Scripture in Light of Pentecost. It explores three key considerations for pentecostal hermeneutics that are drawn from Keener’s volume: the importance of engagement with the global, ecumenical community; the contribution of a distinct pentecostal pneumatology that informs the task of hermeneutics; and the role of analogous experience in the reading of the Old Testament. Scripture, including Old Testament texts, is not self-referential but points to God and God’s activity in creation. The essay concludes that the corrective to an invalid reading should not be prioritizing the original intention of the biblical author; instead, it suggests, the determiner of a valid reading could be found in the theological worldview to which the text points.

In: Pneuma
Author: Jacqueline Grey

Abstract

There has been much debate in biblical scholarship over the alleged “rape” of Bathsheba by David as described in 2 Samuel 11–12. Scholars such as Bailey and Nichol claim that Bathsheba was a consenting partner, while others, including Davidson and Brueggemann, suggest she was a victim of David’s abuse of power. This analysis will explore 2 Samuel 11–12 with a special focus on the themes of power, honor, and shame that emerge in the pericope. These themes are also central to the overall narrative of Samuel. Using literary analysis, I highlight Bathsheba’s isolation and powerlessness as she is “taken” to King David by royal attendants after he has spied her bathing. Bathsheba’s lack of resistance is often compared to the rape of Tamar, which subsequently occurs in the vicinity of the palace in 2 Samuel 13. While Tamar objects to Amnon’s sexual advances in the narrative, Bathsheba does not voice an objection. It is primarily on the basis of her silence that scholars suggest she was a consensual partner. However, there are many differences between Tamar and Bathsheba. Tamar was a daughter of the king and could appeal to relatives in the palace to rescue her from rape. Bathsheba was alone with no one to rescue her. Her silence should not suggest complicity. This is reinforced by the prophetic condemnation by Nathan delivered to King David regarding his abuse of power. While not initially directly accusing the king, the prophet presents a judicial parable to trap the king into condemning himself. Yet, if King David is not corrupted by his power, why does the prophet Nathan need to use a rhetorical strategy to confront him? Convicted and guilty, David repents. The repentance for abuses of power and sexual sin by national leaders is emphasized and modeled by King David. This also provides a model of repentance for the pentecostal community for comparable abuses against victims of power and sexual sin.

In: Pneuma
Author: Jacqueline Grey

Abstract

In the Isaiah memoir, the prophet refers to three children that function as signs that embody his message. The signs of all three children are connected to the political situation of the Syro-Ephraimite Crisis preoccupying Judah at that time. The physical presence of Shear-Jashub (Isa 7:1–9) emphasized the immanence of the prophetic word. It highlights a value of the prophetic community of Isaiah: that a prophetic word, like embodiment, is present. The second child, Immanuel (Isa 7:10–16), highlights the importance of the physical presence of bearers of the prophetic message as imperative to the prophetic message. That is, the message of Isaiah relied upon the prophet and those that embodied his signs to be visible in the community, even when their presence was uncomfortable and unwanted. The third sign (Isa 8:1–4) is produced by the collaboration of Isaiah and the woman-prophet. This highlights the prophetic community of Isaiah as a discerning community that emphasized inclusivity as imperative. Like Isaiah’s community, the pentecostal family both historically and today identifies itself as a prophetic community. Isaiah’s memoir reminds us that prophetic communication should be relevant and immediate. A prophetic community addresses real-world problems and offers solutions that promote the holistic well-being of people and creation in their context. A prophetic community is committed to embodying its message. Yet, while this community is embodied and located in a culture, it needs to see beyond its own culture and the political challenges of its location. While it is important to identify and address the theological and social issues of each location, however, this should not be the sole lens through which we envision the future of Pentecostalism and the future of the Society for Pentecostal Studies.

In: Pneuma
In: Pneuma

Abstract

The article discusses the future of global pentecostalism, focusing on the context of Australia. It first explores the self-identification of pentecostalism as a prophetic community in continuity with the narrative of Luke-Acts. In particular, the implications of the Isaianic mission of Jesus and the early church are discussed. The socially transformative nature of this mission includes not only miracles and healing, but also concern for the poor and marginalized. From this foundation, the article secondly addresses issues within contemporary Australian pentecostalism of individualism and self-reliance that are incompatible with the Isaianic vision. It presents, thirdly, a vision for the Australian pentecostal community that moves beyond a preoccupation with personal empowerment of the Spirit to participate with God in bringing healing and justice to the world.

In: Pneuma
The purpose of Key Approaches to Biblical Ethics is to address fundamental as well as practical questions of methodology in examining the ethical material of the Bible. Sixteen scholars of international reputation, most of them leaders in the field of biblical ethics, discuss questions of biblical interpretation from the perspectives of the Hebrew Bible and New Testament ethics in close dialogue with one another. In the present volume both established and new approaches to biblical ethics are presented and discussed. The result is a volume of unprecedented scholarly interaction that provides key insights into issues of biblical ethics that play a significant role both for biblical interpretation as well as for methodological questions in Jewish and Christian ethics today.
Asia Pacific Pentecostalism, edited by Denise A. Austin, Jacqueline Grey, and Paul W. Lewis, yields previously untold stories and interdisciplinary analysis of pioneer foundations, denominational growth, leadership training, contextualisation, and community development across East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Oceania.
Pentecostalism in the Asia Pacific has made an enormous contribution to its global family—from the more visible influence of Yonggi Cho from Korea to the worship revolutions from Australia (particularly associated with Hillsong) and the lesser known missionary activity from Fiji—each region has contributed significantly to global Christianity. Some communities prospered despite hostile environments and wartime devastation. This volume provides a systematic study of the geographical contexts of Asia Pacific Pentecostalism, including historical development, theological influences, and sociological perspectives.

Contributors are: Doreen Alcoran-Benavidez, Dik Allan, Connie Au, Denise A. Austin, Edwardneil Benavidez, John Carter, Michael Chase, Yung Hun Choi, Darin Clements, Shane Clifton, Dynnice Rosanny Engcoy, Michael J. Frost, Luisa J. Gallagher, Sarita D. Gallagher, Kellesi Gore, Adonis Abelard O. Gorospe, Jacqueline Grey, James Hosack, Ken Huff, Paul W. Lewis, Lim Yeu Chuen, Mathew Mathews, Jason Morris, Nyotxay (pseudonym), Saw Tint Sann Oo, Selena Y. Z. Su, Masakazu Suzuki, and Gani Wiyono.