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In Latina/o/x Studies and Biblical Studies Jacqueline M. Hidalgo introduces Latina/o/x studies for a biblical studies audience. She examines crucial themes that bridge the two fields, themes such as identity and difference with special attention to ethnicity and race; migration with attention to homing, diaspora, transnationalism, and citizenship. She discusses the place of Latina/o/x studies in relevant Hebrew Bible and New Testament scholarship on these topics. Ultimately this essay argues that Latina/o/x studies’ epistemological commitments to complexity, relationality, particularity, and collaborative knowledge-making can help ground critical interpretive approaches in biblical studies. She also imagines a way in which biblical studies—capaciously encompassing the study of Jewish and Christian literature in the ancient world as well as Jewish and Christian biblical reception and rejection histories, and the very category of scriptures more broadly—could deepen Latina/o/x studies' own thinking about canon formation and history.

Abstract

This response discusses the conjunction of “queer,” “temporalities,” and “biblical interpretation.” I argue that these essays demonstrate, through their turn to queer temporalities, that attending to queer time means attending to people in time, to their social practices, to dynamics of power, to violence, to survival, to the lost pasts whose voices still call out to our own, and to the choices we make in reading. The response also turns to borderlands theories, especially the work of Gloria Anzaldúa, and decolonial feminist thought, particularly that of María Lugones, in order to ask questions about biblical studies that cross borders.

In: Biblical Interpretation

Abstract

This essay introduces Latina/o/x studies for a biblical studies audience. It examines crucial themes that bridge Latina/o/x studies and biblical studies, themes such as identity and difference with special attention to ethnicity and race; also migration with attention to homing, diaspora, transnationalism, and citizenship. The place of Latina/o/x studies in relevant Hebrew Bible and New Testament scholarship on these topics is also discussed. Ultimately this essay argues that Latina/o/x studies’ epistemological commitments to complexity, relationality, particularity, and collaborative knowledge-making can help ground critical interpretive approaches in biblical studies. This essay also imagines a way that biblical studies—capaciously encompassing the study of Jewish and Christian literature in the ancient world as well as Jewish and Christian biblical reception and rejection histories, and the very category of scriptures more broadly—could deepen Latina/o/x studies own thinking about canon formation and history.

In: Latina/o/x Studies and Biblical Studies

Abstract

This essay introduces Latina/o/x studies for a biblical studies audience. It examines crucial themes that bridge Latina/o/x studies and biblical studies, themes such as identity and difference with special attention to ethnicity and race; also migration with attention to homing, diaspora, transnationalism, and citizenship. The place of Latina/o/x studies in relevant Hebrew Bible and New Testament scholarship on these topics is also discussed. Ultimately this essay argues that Latina/o/x studies’ epistemological commitments to complexity, relationality, particularity, and collaborative knowledge-making can help ground critical interpretive approaches in biblical studies. This essay also imagines a way that biblical studies—capaciously encompassing the study of Jewish and Christian literature in the ancient world as well as Jewish and Christian biblical reception and rejection histories, and the very category of scriptures more broadly—could deepen Latina/o/x studies own thinking about canon formation and history.

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Biblical Interpretation