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In: Grieving, Brooding, and Transforming: The Spirit, The Bible, and Gender
In: Grieving, Brooding, and Transforming: The Spirit, The Bible, and Gender

Abstract

This chapter explores issues of gender roles through the lens of Song of Songs. While the Songs describe an ideal mutuality of love and desire between the female and male, yet within this idyllic world the female lover is violently assaulted in Songs 5:2–8. Was it because she was ‘acting like a man’ by pursuing her male lover? It considers gender roles and construction in the Old Testament more generally and their ethical implications. Finally, this chapter reflects on the influence of these gender constructions for Pentecostal women today.

In: Sisters, Mothers, Daughters: Pentecostal Perspectives on Violence against Women

This review and the three that follow were originally presented as a panel discussion of John Goldingay’s The Theology of the Book of Isaiah presented at the Society for Pentecostal Studies Biblical Studies section at the 2015 Society for Biblical Literature meeting. This review first presents an overview of the structure of Goldingay’s monograph before exploring and critiquing its content. There are three main issues highlighted in this analysis of Goldingay’s book: 1. the question of the starting point for the development of a biblical theology of Isaiah; 2. the need for ethical reflection and application of the theologies of Isaiah that are developed in Goldingay’s book; and 3. how the theology of revelation explored in Goldingay’s book may contribute to a Pentecostal understanding of prophecy.

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology

This essay provides a critical review of Craig Keener’s Spirit Hermeneutics: Reading Scripture in Light of Pentecost. It explores three key considerations for pentecostal hermeneutics that are drawn from Keener’s volume: the importance of engagement with the global, ecumenical community; the contribution of a distinct pentecostal pneumatology that informs the task of hermeneutics; and the role of analogous experience in the reading of the Old Testament. Scripture, including Old Testament texts, is not self-referential but points to God and God’s activity in creation. The essay concludes that the corrective to an invalid reading should not be prioritizing the original intention of the biblical author; instead, it suggests, the determiner of a valid reading could be found in the theological worldview to which the text points.

In: Pneuma

Abstract

The article discusses the future of global pentecostalism, focusing on the context of Australia. It first explores the self-identification of pentecostalism as a prophetic community in continuity with the narrative of Luke-Acts. In particular, the implications of the Isaianic mission of Jesus and the early church are discussed. The socially transformative nature of this mission includes not only miracles and healing, but also concern for the poor and marginalized. From this foundation, the article secondly addresses issues within contemporary Australian pentecostalism of individualism and self-reliance that are incompatible with the Isaianic vision. It presents, thirdly, a vision for the Australian pentecostal community that moves beyond a preoccupation with personal empowerment of the Spirit to participate with God in bringing healing and justice to the world.

In: Pneuma

Abstract

This article explores how some of the historiography of the Azusa Street Mission reflects the rhetoric of American exceptionalism. It first explores American exceptionalism as well as the development of the Azusa Street Mission in the context of global Pentecostalism. Second, some accounts of the Azusa revival are examined to observe the language of exceptionalism in the retelling of this event. Yet, it is not the purpose of this article to diminish the significance of the Azusa Street Mission in the development of global Pentecostalism. Instead, third, the great contribution of Azusa is discussed, namely, the emphasis on the democratization of the Spirit and its corollary of a Spirit-led, nondiscriminatory leadership. While not distinct in this vision in the context of global Pentecostalism, the Azusa Street Mission does function as an important symbol for the current pentecostal community that aspires to function as a post-racist church. Some implications of this for an emerging pentecostal political theology are briefly presented.

In: Pneuma
In: Key Approaches to Biblical Ethics
In: Key Approaches to Biblical Ethics