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Abstract

Deuteronomy’s description of the use of violence in the extermination of the people of the land in relation to the election of Israel has had important influence on Jewish and Christian literature. This chapter particularly focuses on its impact on the book of Jubilees, but some later reflections will also be discussed. In the book of Jubilees, the impact of Deuteronomy 7 and related texts is especially visible in Abraham’s farewell speeches. Several stipulations are very similar – for example, the destruction of places with foreign cults, the danger of participating in foreign sacrificial meals, the prohibition against mixed marriages, and the prohibition against making treaties. In Jubilees, these aspects are strongly related to the issue of purity and Gentile impurities, aspects that are not elaborated upon in Deuteronomy 7. Some later reflections on the reading of Deuteronomy 7 within Judaism and Christianity are also included. These indicate various strategies for dealing with the problems concerning the command to annihilate the Canaanites. Violent texts in the Old Testament were ignored, rejected, or interpreted figuratively. Sometimes, however, they inspired and shaped wars and violent behaviour in the real world – or helped to justify such acts.

In: Violence in the Hebrew Bible

Abstract

Deuteronomy’s description of the use of violence in the extermination of the people of the land in relation to the election of Israel has had important influence on Jewish and Christian literature. This chapter particularly focuses on its impact on the book of Jubilees, but some later reflections will also be discussed. In the book of Jubilees, the impact of Deuteronomy 7 and related texts is especially visible in Abraham’s farewell speeches. Several stipulations are very similar – for example, the destruction of places with foreign cults, the danger of participating in foreign sacrificial meals, the prohibition against mixed marriages, and the prohibition against making treaties. In Jubilees, these aspects are strongly related to the issue of purity and Gentile impurities, aspects that are not elaborated upon in Deuteronomy 7. Some later reflections on the reading of Deuteronomy 7 within Judaism and Christianity are also included. These indicate various strategies for dealing with the problems concerning the command to annihilate the Canaanites. Violent texts in the Old Testament were ignored, rejected, or interpreted figuratively. Sometimes, however, they inspired and shaped wars and violent behaviour in the real world – or helped to justify such acts.

In: Violence in the Hebrew Bible
In: Violence in the Hebrew Bible
In: Violence in the Hebrew Bible
In: The Divine Father
In: Flores Florentino

Abstract

This article investigates the image of Jacob in Targum Jonathan’s interpretation of Hos 12. It presents a brief comparison between the Hebrew text of Hos 12 and the Targum’s translation, and focuses on those verses that are relevant to the image of Jacob (Hos 12:3-6; 12:13-14), looking first at the Hebrew text and then at their interpretation in the Targum. An analysis of the translation clearly shows the meturgeman’s concern to counteract any potential negative image of Jacob. The meturgeman does not present the relationship between Jacob and the prophet’s contemporary people as analogous, in the sense that the deceitful character of the people is a reflection of the character of their forefather. Instead, the relationship is seen as contrasting: Jacob functions as a role model.

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism