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Studies in the Hebrew Bible and Second Temple Literature
From Revelation to Canon is a collection of essays that offers studies of texts, traditions, and themes from the Hebrew Bible and from the extra-biblical literature of the second-temple period.
Included in it are studies of apocalypticism, the high priesthood, calendars and festivals, and a series of essays on aspects of 1 Enoch and the Book of Jubilees. There is also a previously unpublished essay on the development of a canon of scripture in Judaism.
The volume gathers in one place, papers that were originally published in several journals, volumes of essays, and Festschriften.

This publication has also been published in paperback, please click here for details.

Abstract

The Serek and the Damascus Document describe aspects of the procedures by which a person joined the community, and Josephus explains the entry procedures for aspiring Essenes. An oath is included in all of these descriptions, but, it has been claimed, it is placed at different points in them. A close examination of the texts shows that all of the sources probably locate the oath at the same point in the process of entry into the community; as a result, this aspect of the entry procedures constitutes another close parallel between the communal texts found at Qumran and Josephus's description of the Essenes.

In: Dead Sea Discoveries

Abstract

The present paper explores the ways in which the authors of the Hebrew Book of Jubilees and the Aramaic Visions of Amram used the motif of a Canaanite-Egyptian war as they labored with the issues raised by the accounts at the end of Genesis and the beginning of Exodus. There is no clear indication that either writer used the work of the other; rather the war in question seems to have been a motif that was available to both when they composed their works and that each adopted and adapted independently.

In: Dead Sea Discoveries
In: Dead Sea Discoveries
In: Dead Sea Discoveries
In: Dead Sea Discoveries
In: Dead Sea Discoveries