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This series publishes coherent research companions providing scholarly investigations of key themes and subjects in all aspects of medieval and early modern musical culture in Europe. Written by the foremost specialists in the field, the volumes offer broad and balanced accounts along with a synthesis of debate, reflections on the field, and considerations of future directions for research.

Each title presents a detailed and academic introduction to the topic to newcomers to a field, while also providing fresh insights, angles, and perspectives to scholars already well-versed in the area. The books are equipped with up-to-date bibliographies, and include images, musical examples, and other supporting apparatus as necessary. Offering cross-volume discussion of the most pertinent questions, each companion demonstrates a lively sense of current debates, and gives new impetus to future discourse.

Prospective editors of companion volumes are invited to contact the publisher at Brill, Dr Kate Hammond, to discuss their proposed project.

Brill is in full support of Open Access publishing and offers the option to publish your monograph, edited volume, or chapter in Open Access. Our Open Access services are fully compliant with funder requirements. We support Creative Commons licenses. For more information, please visit Brill Open or contact us at openacess@brill.com.
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Abstract

Recent studies have made a persuasive case that John Chrysostom should be considered a “medico-philosophical psychic therapist” in the classical tradition. Like the philosophers before him, he prescribed a regimen of spiritual exercises to bring the disordered passions under control. This chapter, however, will re-examine the extent of his dependence on the philosophical tradition, and in particular will argue that the scriptures and the Christian tradition exercise a more important influence on the fundamental nature of his diagnosis of spiritual sickness and its therapy. Whilst for the classical philosophers the ultimate goal of therapy was the achievement of happiness or wellbeing in the present, for Chrysostom it was to be found in avoiding God’s judgement for sin and receiving the blessings of eternal life. For him, the sick are those who are facing the judgement of God, and a key part of his therapy of the soul is to awaken in them a fear of hell that they may live more obedient lives and “receive the good things that are to come.” He was therefore in many ways more similar to the prophets of the Old Testament and the Christian preachers of the New: his preaching largely focussed on a message of repentance and obedience to a God who would be his congregation’s judge at the resurrection.

In: Revisioning John Chrysostom
The Biblical Texts from the Judaean Desert
The Dead Sea Scrolls Concordance volume 3 for the first time indexes all of the biblical materials which have been found in a wide range of Judaean Desert sites. It provides a convenient index to the 276 biblical scrolls published in the Discoveries in the Judaean Desert series and elsewhere.

This keyword-in-context concordance, prepared by Martin G. Abegg, Jr., James E. Bowley and Edward M. Cook contains a new and consistent linguistic analysis of all the words found in the biblical Dead Sea Scrolls. The total
number of entries totals nearly 95,000 words. Every entry includes the keyword with its context. All keywords have an English translation, and the Hebrew and Aramaic sections are organized in alphabetical order rather than by verbal root, which makes the concordance easier to consult for the non-specialist.

This concordance to the biblical texts from the Judaean Desert is the third of a series of three. Volume one consists of concordances to the non-biblical texts from Qumran and the second volume will index all the non-biblical texts from sites other than Qumran.
The Non-Qumran Documents and Texts
The Dead Sea Scrolls Concordance, Volume 2, presents for the first time an index to the Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek text of the non-biblical, non-Qumran Judaean Desert documents in one publication. The contents of this volume are defined by E. Tov’s Revised Lists (Brill, 2010). In the main the Concordance serves as an index for volumes II and III of the Judean Desert Studies (JDS), volumes II, XXVII, XXVIII, and XXXVIII of the Discoveries in the Judaean Desert (DJD), and volumes I, II, and VI of Masada: The Yigael Yadin Excavations 1963-1965, Final Reports.
For decades a concordance of all the Dead Sea Scrolls has been a major desideratum for scholarship. The Dead Sea Scrolls Concordance covers all the Qumran material as published in the Discoveries in the Judaean Desert series, as well as the major texts from caves 1 and 11, which appeared elsewhere.
This keyword-in-context concordance, prepared by Martin G. Abegg in collaboration with other scholars, contains a new and consistent linguistic analysis of all the words found in the Dead Sea Scrolls. The total number of entries is around 134,000. Every entry includes the keyword with its context, exactly as published in the editions referred to above, with notes on some readings. All keywords have an English translation, and they are listed in alphabetical order rather than by verbal root, which makes the concordance easier to consult for the non-specialist.
This concordance to the non-biblical texts from Qumran is the first of a projected series of three. Future volumes will consist of concordances to the biblical texts from Qumran and to the texts from other sites in the Judean Desert. All volumes of the print edition will become available in individual e-books: 9789004531338 (volume 1) - 9789004531321 (volume 2).
For decades a concordance of all the Dead Sea Scrolls has been a major desideratum for scholarship. The Dead Sea Scrolls Concordance consists of three volumes and covers all the Qumran material as published in the Discoveries in the Judaean Desert series, as well as the major texts from caves 1 and 11, which appeared elsewhere. Volume 1 indexes the non-biblical texts from Qumran, Volume 2 is a concordance to the non-biblical, non-Qumran Judaean Desert documents, and Volume 3 provides a convenient index to all of the biblical materials found in a wide range of Judaean Desert sites. All keywords have an English translation, and they are listed in alphabetical order rather than by verbal root, which makes the concordance easier to consult for the non-specialist.

Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are found worldwide with the exception of only a few countries including New Zealand, Patagonia, the Hawaiian Isles and Antarctica. They are a nuisance pest to human beings, but transmit a number of diseases that mainly affect livestock. Like many haematophagous insects, midges have evolved highly developed and sensitive olfactory mechanisms which allow them to locate a potential mate or a suitable vertebrate host. This chapter provides a brief overview of the Culicoides midge lifecycle, its status as a vector of disease and offers an extensive review of Culicoides chemical ecology research, which has led to the identification of semiochemicals that could be exploited to control them. Host location processes can be influenced by many factors including midge physiology, host kairomones, the complex interactions of other volatile chemicals that confer differential attractiveness of hosts and also physical cues such as light levels and climatic conditions. These factors are considered in detail and future areas of work are discussed.

Open Access
In: Olfaction in vector-host interactions
In: The Dead Sea Scrolls Concordance, Volume 1.1