Search Results

Restricted Access

James Morley

Abstract

Yoga, the ancient inter-religious thread running through all Indian Spirituality, shares a remarkable congruence with twentieth-century phenomenology. But this conjuncture is not based on a common aspiration of "transcendence from the world," as argued by previous comparisons. Instead, by applying the more advanced Existential Phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty to the more indigenous Tantric stream of yoga, it will be shown that this congruence occurs in just the opposite direction of immersion into the very "flesh of the world"—the lived human body as homology of the cosmos. Yoga may offer phenomenology a much-needed somatic contemplative praxis, as much as phenomenology may offer yoga the basis for an appropriate theoretical articulation.

Restricted Access

James Morley

Abstract

This is an empirical phenomenological inquiry into everyday experiences of daydreaming. The theoretical literature was found to be deficient in accounting for the ambiguity inherent to the phenomenon and lacking in concrete empirical descriptions. This study's phenomenological method was implemented in response to a body of natural scientific studies utilizing methods that were found to be inadequate to the task of comprehending and understanding the lived subjective experience of the phenomenon. From five subject interviews and their subsequent analysis via the phenomenological method, the researcher was able to derive a general structural description of the experience of daydreaming. It was found that daydreaming is essentially the representation/enactment of a mood, the understanding of which is inseparable from the situated biographical project of the individual. As an act of consciousness it was described as a passive movement into two, distinct subject-world relationships, sustained by a directing-spectator position that is both detached and interfused with these two world relations. Details of these findings and their implications are discussed.

Restricted Access

James Morley

Full Access

Edited by James Morley

The peer-reviewed Journal of Phenomenological Psychology publishes articles that advance the discipline of psychology from the perspective of the Continental phenomenology movement. Within that tradition, phenomenology is understood in the broadest possible sense including its transcendental, existential, hermeneutic, and narrative strands and is not meant to convey the thought of any one individual. Articles advance the discipline of psychology by applying phenomenology to enhance the field’s philosophical foundations, critical reflection, theoretical development, research methodologies, empirical research, and applications in such areas as clinical, educational, and organizational psychology.
The Journal of Phenomenological Psychology was founded in 1970 and has consistently demonstrated the relevance of phenomenology for psychology in areas involving qualitative research methods, the entire range of psychological subject matters, and theoretical approaches such as the psychoanalytic, cognitive, biological, behavioral, humanistic, and psychometric. The overall aim is to further the psychological understanding of the human person in relation to self, world, others, and time. Because the potential of Continental phenomenology for enhancing psychology is vast and the field is still developing, innovative and creative applications or phenomenological approaches to psychological problems are especially welcome.

Need support prior to submitting your manuscript? Make the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript easier with Brill's suite of author services, an online platform that connects academics seeking support for their work with specialized experts who can help.
NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in Journal of Phenomenological Psychology can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here. For any questions you may contact the Editor in Chief James Morley at jmorley@ramapo.edu.