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Abstract

Herman Dooyeweerd (, 28) writes that “the idea of cosmic time constitutes the basis of the philosophical theory of reality in [A New Critique of Theoretical Thought].” My aim is to present and defend the hypothesis that Dooyeweerd’s idea of time is, in part, mistaken at its foundation. His idea of a cosmic temporal coherence of diverse modal aspects arose from the absolutization of a concept of temporal universality that he adopted uncritically as the transcendental basic Idea of cosmic time. My immanent-critical assessment leads to the hypothesis that temporality should be recognized as the first modal aspect, which, for Dooyeweerd, has been lost to view. Recovering both the sphere sovereignty of the temporal aspect and the equal universality of all aspects opens the way to a resolution of Dooyeweerd’s temporal/supratemporal dialectic and to a new perspective on naive experience and the meaning of humans as God’s image.

In: Philosophia Reformata
In: Philosophia Reformata
In: Philosophia Reformata
In: Philosophia Reformata

Abstract

This contribution, which is based on a keynote address at a conference on Christianity and international politics sketches three major challenges that face practitioners and theorists alike. The first is to recognize and deal forthrightly with the normative dimension of international political responsibilities. The second is to seek a big-picture understanding of our shrinking, diversifying world with all of its rapidly changing, intensifying complexities in domestic governance, non-government organizations, and international administrative and adjudicating bodies. The final challenge is to ask self-critically how Christians should be approaching the responsibilities they exercise in domestic and international affairs as well as in research, writing, and teaching in the field.

In: Christian Faith, Philosophy & International Relations

Abstract

This contribution, which is based on a keynote address at a conference on Christianity and international politics sketches three major challenges that face practitioners and theorists alike. The first is to recognize and deal forthrightly with the normative dimension of international political responsibilities. The second is to seek a big-picture understanding of our shrinking, diversifying world with all of its rapidly changing, intensifying complexities in domestic governance, non-government organizations, and international administrative and adjudicating bodies. The final challenge is to ask self-critically how Christians should be approaching the responsibilities they exercise in domestic and international affairs as well as in research, writing, and teaching in the field.

In: Christian Faith, Philosophy & International Relations
Author: James W Skillen

The program for this conference indicates that one of the fruitful, and thus positive, consequences of the conjunction of the western Enlightenment with Christianity has been political freedom and democracy, the breakup of state absolutism, and the establishing of human rights. Since these political-legal practices and ideals now appear to be almost universally approved or aspired to, we might hypothesize that they transcend, or serve as the ultimate political telos, for all cultures and societies. On the other hand, the truth might simply be that the push for democracy and human rights around the world represents nothing more than the pressures of western hegemony.

In: Philosophia Reformata