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Editor: Jan Bloemendal
A peer-reviewed series on topics in early modern forms of theatre, theatricality and drama. Contributions may come from any of the disciplines within the humanities, such as theatre studies, musicology, literary history, art history, book history, church history, social history, cultural history, and history of ideas. The series aims to open up new areas of research or new approaches to early modern drama. It publishes monographs, collections of essays and key text editions.

The series publishes an average of one volume per year. The series' editor-in-chief is Jan Bloemendal.
Editor: Jan Bloemendal
In his ‘Project of the New Testament’ Erasmus also wrote a running commentary on all New Testament books, except Revelation, in the form of a paraphrase. In this volume, the Paraphrase on Luke – Latin text with critical apparatus, and English introduction and commentary, is edited. In the paraphrase, Erasmus turns out to be a mature interpreter of the Bible, who advocated a new Christianity, which he called ‘the philosophy of Christ’, and implicitly criticized the clergy of his own age.
Latin and Vernacular Cultures - Examples of Bilingualism and Multilingualism c. 1300-1800
Author: Jan Bloemendal
Bilingual Europe presents to the reader a Europe that for a long time was ‘multilingual’: besides the vernacular languages Latin played an important role. Even ‘nationalistic’ treatises could be written in Latin. Until deep into the 18th century scientific works were written in it. It is still an official language of the Roman Catholic Church. But why did authors choose for Latin or for their native tongue? In the case of bilingual authors, what made them choose either language, and what implications did that have? What interactions existed between the two?

Contributors include Jan Bloemendal, Wiep van Bunge, H. Floris Cohen, Arjan C. van Dixhoorn, Guillaume van Gemert, Joep T. Leerssen, Ingrid Rowland, Arie Schippers, Eva Del Soldato, Demmy Verbeke, Françoise Waquet, and Ari H. Wesseling†.
Poeticarum institutionum libri tres / Institutes of Poetics in Three Books
Author: Jan Bloemendal
This is a new critical edition (in two volumes) of Vossius' Latin Poeticae institutiones, with a translation in English, an introduction, annotations and a commentary. In 1647 the Amsterdam professor Gerardus Vossius published his main work on poetics, Poeticarum institutionum libri III, which can be considered as an important result of the Dutch Golden Age. In the same year two shorter works appeared, De artis poeticae natura ac constitutione, which is an introduction to the main work, and De imitatione, which elaborates on two aspects of poetics: imitation and recitation. These are added in appendices, also with a translation, but without a commentary. Now this important early modern work on the making of poetry (labeled by Sellin as 'The last of the Renaissance monsters') is made available also for readers without Latin.
Editor: Jan Bloemendal
This is the first edition since its original publication of Daniel Heinsius’ Latin tragedy Auriacus, sive Libertas saucia (Orange, or Liberty Wounded, 1602), with an introduction, a parallel English translation, and a commentary. Centering on the assassination of William of Orange, one of the leaders of the Dutch Revolt against King Philip II of Spain, Auriacus was Heinsius’ history drama, with which he aimed to raise Dutch drama to the level of classical drama. Highly influential, the tragedy contributed to the construction of a national identity in the Low Countries and launched Heinsius’ long career as an internationally celebrated poet and professor at Leiden University.
In: Erasmus Studies
Author: Jan Bloemendal

In 1516 Erasmus published his new Latin translation of the New Testament. After that he started to write his paraphrases of all books, except Apocalypse. This introduction gives a state of the art. It will be first discussed when and where Erasmus wrote his paraphrases, which were composed between May 1517 and January 1524 when he was also reworking his Novum Instrumentum/ Novum Testamentum. The next issue treated is what kind of work they are, being a kind of commentary, but also an aid for preachers to bring the New Testament to their audience. This is related to the aim Erasmus had with his ‘New Testament project’: to advance the philosophia Christi and Christian piety, and his intended or implied readership, theologians. He used several sources to bring his interpretations of the biblical stories in line with the exegetical tradition.

In: Erasmus Studies
Author: Jan Bloemendal

This article discusses how Erasmus deals with the personae in the Paraphrase on Luke, distinguishing between the author Erasmus (the paraphrast), the narrator (the paraphraser) and the evangelist. These ‘Luke-voices’ are connected to exegesis (explanation of the narrative) and hermeneutics (the application of the narrative to the lives of the audience). It is argued that Erasmus deliberately played with the voices; this enabled him to criticize wrongs of his own times as worded by ‘Luke’, and to contribute to the advancement of Christian piety.

In: Erasmus Studies