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Author: Jan Just Witkam

Abstract

Johann Gottfried Wetzstein (1815–1905) brought together several collections of manuscripts while working as the Prussian consul in Damascus (1848–1862). Collecting manuscripts was just one of his numerous activities. Among the Arabic volumes that he gathered, and that are now in the Staatsbibliothek in Berlin, are many manuscripts containing popular stories. In the eighth volume of his catalogue of the Berlin collection (1896), Wilhelm Ahlwardt describes all the stories belonging to the Wetzstein and other collections. This is a rich source for Arabic popular storytelling, but it has been engaged with only infrequently during the long century after the publication of Ahlwardt’s fundamental work. The present essay explores some of Wetzstein’s manuscript storytelling texts and proposes ideas for a formal typology.

In: Manuscripts, Politics and Oriental Studies
Author: Jan Just Witkam

Abstract

Johann Gottfried Wetzstein (1815–1905) brought together several collections of manuscripts while working as the Prussian consul in Damascus (1848–1862). Collecting manuscripts was just one of his numerous activities. Among the Arabic volumes that he gathered, and that are now in the Staatsbibliothek in Berlin, are many manuscripts containing popular stories. In the eighth volume of his catalogue of the Berlin collection (1896), Wilhelm Ahlwardt describes all the stories belonging to the Wetzstein and other collections. This is a rich source for Arabic popular storytelling, but it has been engaged with only infrequently during the long century after the publication of Ahlwardt’s fundamental work. The present essay explores some of Wetzstein’s manuscript storytelling texts and proposes ideas for a formal typology.

In: Manuscripts, Politics and Oriental Studies
In: Scholarship between Europe and the Levant
Author: Jan Just Witkam

Abstract

The article describes the modest collection of Islamic manuscripts in Victoria, B.C. (Western Canada). One manuscript in particular, a remarkable late Ottoman illustrated prayer book, receives attention. The little amount of other Islamic manuscripts that somehow have found their way to Victoria’s University Library are described here for the first time.

In: Journal of Islamic Manuscripts
Author: Jan Just Witkam

In all, six manuscripts in the Toulouse library are described here. Five of these are Arabic manuscripts (mss 898, 899, 900, 1024 and 1635) and one is of a certain interest to the subject (ms 1438, Perbòsc’s notes). Of the five Arabic manuscripts three are copies of (parts of) the Qurʾān (mss 900, 1024 and 1635), and these sometimes also contain prayers or other religious texts. The surprise in the Toulouse library is actually ms 899, with its three well-told Maghribī stories, two of which can be placed in an ʿArabī context whereas one is more of ʿAǧamī, early Persian origin. Due to an inadequate description in the catalogue of 1904, manuscript 899 has remained virtually unknown. The scripts of the Toulousan manuscripts points to three different regions of origin, the Mashriq (ms 898), the Maghrib (mss 899, 900, 1635) and the Bilād al-Sūdān (ms 1024). None of the manuscripts seems older than the 19th century. All are written on paper.

In: Journal of Islamic Manuscripts
Author: Jan Just Witkam

This article provides a bibliographical description of the content of eighteen manuscript volumes acquired by the Leiden University library, directly from Yemen, in the course of 2000. They contain a great variety of subjects, ranging from language to literature, history, religion and Islamic law. They date from 1042 (1632) to 1359 (1941), but most date from the 14th/20th century. Together, they give an impression of traditional Yemeni scholarship and book culture. An attempt is made to analyze the Ihmāl marks, a feature that has survived particularly in Yemeni manuscripts, and which occurs in many of the manuscripts described here.

In: Journal of Islamic Manuscripts
In: Journal of Islamic Manuscripts
Author: Jan Just Witkam

Abstract

Within the past two centuries, the Dutch Juynboll family has brought forth six Orientalists, the last bearer of the family name, Gautier Juynboll, having passed away in December 2010. This article presents and describes, for the first time, a small collection of Oriental, mainly Islamic, manuscripts that has been found as part of the Juynboll estate. These materials include not only original manuscripts, but also scholarly notes reflecting the work of several Juynboll scholars, annotated books, microfilms and archival materials. The collection here described has now been incorporated into the collections of Leiden University Library. Juynboll manuscripts and archives that were already in the Leiden Library are described here as well.

In: Journal of Islamic Manuscripts