Search Results

Restricted Access

Church History and Religious Culture

Formerly: Nederlands Archief voor Kerkgeschiedenis

Church History and Religious Culture (formerly: Nederlands Archief voor Kerkgeschiedenis / Dutch Review of Church History) is a long-established, peer-reviewed periodical, primarily devoted to the history of Christianity. It contains articles in this field as well as in other specialised related areas.

For many years the Nederlands Archief voor Kerkgeschiedenis has established itself as an unrivalled resource for the subject both in the major research libraries of the world and in the private collections of professors and scholars. Now published under the title Church History and Religious Culture, this journal offers you an easy way to stay on top of your discipline.

With an international circulation, Church History and Religious Culture provides its readers with articles in English. Frequent theme issues allow deeper, cutting-edge discussion of selected topics. An extensive book review section is included in every issue keeping you up to date with all the latest information in the field of church history.

For more information visit also the book series Brill's Series in Church History.

Need support prior to submitting your manuscript? Make the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript easier with Brill's suite of author services, an online platform that connects academics seeking support for their work with specialized experts who can help.

NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in Church History and Religious Culture can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

For Brill's Open Access policy click here.

Restricted Access

Series:

Jan Wim Buisman, Marjet Derks and Peter Raedts

Restricted Access

Series:

Jan Wim Buisman, Marjet Derks and Peter Raedts

Restricted Access

Episcopacy, Authority, and Gender

Aspects of Religious Leadership in Europe, 1100-2000

Series:

What is the base of religious leadership and how has it changed over the centuries? This volume presents a range of actors, both men and women, who, in a variety of historical contexts, claimed to be the living voices or intermediaries of God. The essays analyse the foundation of their authoritative claims and ask how and how far they succeeded in securing obedience from the Christians to whom they addressed their message. Religious authority is not understood as a monolithic entity but as something derived from many sources and claims. Whatever the national background, whether ordained or supposedly appointed through divine intervention, the histories of the people portrayed underline the long-term manifestations and multifaceted nature of Christian identity.