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In: Post-Empire Imaginaries?
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Abstract

Combining a gendered postcolonial with a generic approach, this essay demonstrates how the British Empire is being domesticated and normalised in middlebrow fiction about the British West Indies from the end of the nineteenth century until the late 1930s. In their novels, Augusta Zelia Fraser and Margaret Long merge the conventions of domestic realism and the Bildungsroman as well historical romance, Gothic and crime to translate imperial concerns about gender, social class and race into the language of their white and female middle-class readers in the metropolis.

In: Imperial Middlebrow
Author:

Abstract

Combining a gendered postcolonial with a generic approach, this essay demonstrates how the British Empire is being domesticated and normalised in middlebrow fiction about the British West Indies from the end of the nineteenth century until the late 1930s. In their novels, Augusta Zelia Fraser and Margaret Long merge the conventions of domestic realism and the Bildungsroman as well historical romance, Gothic and crime to translate imperial concerns about gender, social class and race into the language of their white and female middle-class readers in the metropolis.

In: Imperial Middlebrow
In: With Open Eyes
In: Postcolonial Studies across the Disciplines
In: Postcolonial Studies across the Disciplines
In: Postcolonial Studies across the Disciplines
In: Postcolonial Studies across the Disciplines
Volume Editors: and
The collection Imperial Middlebrow, edited by Christoph Ehland and Jana Gohrisch, takes middlebrow studies further in two ways. First, it focuses on the role middlebrow writing played in the popularisation and dissemination of imperial ideology. It combines the interest in the wider function of literature for a colonial society with close scrutiny of the ideological and socio-economic contexts of writers and readers. The essays cover the Girl’s Own Paper, fiction about colonial India including its appearance in Scottish writing, the West Indies, the South Pacific, as well as illustrations of Haggard’s South African imperial romances. Second, the volume proposes using the concept of the middlebrow as an analytical tool to read recent Black and Asian British as well as Nigerian fiction.